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Full text of "Report of the Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission"

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THE LIBRARY OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 




THE COLLECTION OF 
NORTH CAROLINIANA 



C906 
C29tl 






UNIVERSITY OF N.C. AT CHAPEL HILL 



00041084879 

FOR USE ONLY IN 
THE NORTH CAROLINA COLLECTION 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://archive.org/details/reportofcarolinaOOcaro 



Report of 

The Carolina Charter 

Tercentenary Commission 



Honorable Francis E. Winslow 
Chairman 



December 31, 1963 




Published by the 

State Department of Archives and History 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

1964 



Report of 

The Carolina Charter 

Tercentenary Commission 



Honorable Francis E. Winslow 
Chairman 

December 31, 1963 




Published by the 

State Department of Archives and History 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

1964 



THE CAROLINA CHARTER TERCENTENARY 
COMMISSION 



as of December 31, 1963 



Hon. Francis E. Winslow, Chairman 



Henry Belk 

Mrs. Doris Betts 

Dr. Chalmers G. Davidson 

Mrs. Everett L. Durham 

William C. Fields 

William Carrington Gretter, Jr. 

Grayson Harding 

Mrs. James M. Harper, Jr. 

Mrs. Ernest L. Ives 

Dr. Henry W. Jordan 



Mrs. Kauno A. Lehto 

James G. W. MacLamroc 

Mrs. Harry McMullan 

Dr. Paul Murray 

Dan M. Paul 

Dr. Robert H. Spiro, Jr. 

David Stick 

J. P. Strother 

Mrs. J. O. Tally, Jr. 

Rt. Rev. Thomas H. Wright 



Dr. Charles F. Carroll, 
Superintendent of 
Public Instruction 



Ex-Officio 



Robert L. Stallings, 
Director, Department of 
Conservation and Development 



Dr. Christopher Crittenden 
Director, Department of 
Archives and History, 

Secretary 



Executive Secretary 
Brig. Gen. John D. F. Phillips, U. S. Army (Ret.) 



Members Appointed for the Term September II, 1959- 
August 31, 1961 



Winston Broadfoot 

Dr. H. H. Cunningham 

Lambert Davis 1 

Mrs. Inglis Fletcher 

Paul Green 

Mrs. William D. Holmes, Jr. 



Mrs. Robert Grady Johnson 
Ben Dixon MacNeill 2 
D. Victor Meekins 3 
George M. Stephens 
Gilbert T. Stephenson 4 
Hon. J. Emmett Winslow 



1 Reappointed for the term beginning September 1, 1961 ; resigned August 15, 1962. 

2 Deceased May 27, 1960. 

3 Appointed July 30, 1960 to fill vacancy caused by Mr. MacNeill's death. 

4 Resigned January 24, 1961. 



CAROLINA CHARTER TERCENTENARY 

COMMISSION 

BOX 1881 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

December 31, 1963 

Honorable Terry Sanford 
Governor of North Carolina 
State Capitol 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

Your Excellency: 

I have the honor of transmitting herewith the final re- 
port of the Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission. 
Some of the highlights of the year-long observance are sum- 
marized in the following paragraphs. 

The Commission's achievements in the field of scholar- 
ship include publication of the initial volume of a com- 
pletely new edition of the Colonial Records of North Caro- 
lina, and assembly of a very large quantity of original source 
materials hitherto unpublished. 

Our Commission notes with satisfaction its contribution 
to the education of our young people through the publica- 
tion and distribution to schools and libraries throughout the 
State of a series of historical pamphlets dealing with the 
little-known period 1663-1763. Other contributions in this 
area were the Essay Contest for junior and senior high school 
students, the Mobile Museum of History, and the historical 
motion picture "The Road to Carolina." 

In the field of the Arts, mention may be made of the Ter- 
centenary Art Exhibit in Raleigh, held in March and April, 
the symphonic composition "North State" by Hunter John- 
son, and the Commission's Literary Competition. 

The Commission has succeeded in making the nation 
aware of North Carolina's Tercentenary through two other 
projects: The Carolina Charter Commemorative Stamp, 
issued by the Post Office Department in April; and the tele- 
vision musical drama "The Sojourner and Mollie Sinclair," 
by Carlisle Floyd. 



North Carolina's citizens were made more knowledgeable 
of the State's heritage and its role in the early development 
of the nation through a state-wide program of local com- 
memorative observances. These activities, in which countless 
thousands of persons participated, took many forms, as a 
glance at this section of the enclosed report will disclose. 
The programs must be regarded as a form of public educa- 
tion in the history of the State. 

The cost to the State of the Tercentenary program was 
$257,216 out of total appropriations of $261,996. In addi- 
tion, more than $85,000 of private funds was contributed or 
pledged as a result of the efforts of the Commission and its 
related agency, the North Carolina Tercentenary Celebra- 
tion Commission which was established by the federal gov- 
ernment. For the first year and a half of its life the Commis- 
sion's staff comprised two persons; thereafter it never ex- 
ceeded ten, half of whom were concerned exclusively with 
the Colonial Records project. 

The Commisison is privileged to have had a part in the 
conduct of this unique celebration which it feels has fur- 
thered civic pride and thus contributed to responsible citi- 
zenship in our State. We would, however, be remiss in our 
duties if we failed to urge in the strongest terms greater 
support by the State government for the Colonial Records 
project. The Commission believes that no undertaking of 
the Tercentenary program is more deserving of such sup- 
port. North Carolina owes it to herself to assemble the source 
materials which will make possible the preparation of more 
complete and accurate history books to replace those now 
in use. The latter have, for the most part, been written by 
scholars with inadequate reference materials and, in conse- 
quence, have accorded scant recognition to North Carolina's 
part in the formation of the American nation. 

Faithfully, 



F. E. Winslow 
Chairman 

Enclosure: Report of the Carolina Charter Tercentenary 
Commission 



CONTENTS 

Page 
The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission ii 

Chairman's Letter of Transmittal iii 

CHAPTER 

I. Introduction 1 

II. Formulating the Tercentenary Program 5 

III. Scholarly Activities 8 

IV. Programs in Schools, Colleges 

and Universities 13 

V. Arts 22 

VI. Religious Activities 28 

VII. Local Commemorative Observances 31 

VIII. Financing the Tercentenary Programs 63 

IX . M iscellaneous 69 

X. Acknowledgments - 78 

APPENDIXES 

I. Committees of the Carolina Charter 

Tercentenary Commission 80 

II. North Carolina Tercentenary 

Celebration Commission 94 

III. Receipts and Expenditures of 

Carolina Charter Corporation Funds 95 



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CHAPTER I 

Introduction 

The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission was es- 
tablished by the 1959 General Assembly of North Carolina 
in order to "make plans and develop a program for celebra- 
tion of the tercentenary of the granting of the Carolina 
Charter of 1663, and at the appropriate time or times [to] 
conduct such celebration or celebrations." x This act fixed 
the size of the Commission at 22 members to be appointed 
by the Governor for a term of two years, in addition to three 
ex officio members: the Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion, the Director of the State Department of Archives and 
History, and the Director of the Department of Conserva- 
tion and Development. The appointive members were issued 
commissions dated September 1, 1959. The Honorable 
Francis E. Winslow of Rocky Mount was appointed Chair- 
man. Provision was made in the 1959 legislation for defray- 
ing the start-up expenses of the Commission from the Con- 
tingency and Emergency Fund. 

Following an organizational meeting of the Commission 
on October 15, 1959, there was appointed an Executive 
Committee consisting of Mr. Winslow as Chairman; Dr. 
Christopher Crittenden, Director of the State Department 
of Archives and History, as Secretary; and the following 
additional members: Mr. Henry Belk, Goldsboro; Dean 
H. H. Cunningham, Elon Colleoe 2 ; Mr. Lambert Davis, 
Chapel Hill 3 ; Mrs. Robert Grady Johnson, Burgaw 2 ; and 
Mr. David Stick, Kitty Hawk. Mr. James G. W. MacLamroc, 
Greensboro, was appointed to the Executive Committee July 
14, 1961; Mrs. J. O. Tally, Jr., Fayetteville, and Mr. 
Dan M. Paul, Raleigh, November 21, 1961; and Dr. H. W. 
Jordan, Cedar Falls, April 13, 1962. 

The executive group first convened December 11, 1959, 
at which time it was decided to secure the services of a di- 



1 Session Laws of 1959, Chapter 1238. 

2 Term expired August 31, 1961. 

3 Resigned August 15, 1962. 



2 The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 

rector to be designated executive secretary, and a small staff. 
On May 16, 1960, Brigadier General John D. F. Phillips, 
U.S.A. (Ret.) was appointed Executive Secretary. Miss Julia 
Ribet was employed as clerk May 20, 1960. Arrangements 
were made to establish an office in Raleigh at 121 Halifax 
Street. 

The Commission held a plenary meeting May 20, 1960, at 
which two significant actions were taken. First, it was decided 
to adopt as a major objective of the Carolina Charter Ter- 
centenary the provision by the State of an appropriate build- 
ing to serve as the repository for North Carolina's archives 
and other historical items, and as headquarters for the State's 
historical program and activities. Second, the Commission 
approved in principle the recommendations of its Executive 
Secretary regarding the scope and content of a program for 
the observance of the Carolina Charter Tercentenary. 

While the Commission was only one of a large number of 
public and private organizations and agencies interested in 
securing the construction of the facilities badly needed by 
the State Department of Archives and History, it was able 
to bring the requirement to the attention of an important 
segment of the public during a propitious period. It is 
gratifying to record, therefore, that construction of the de- 
sired building was authorized and financed by the 1963 
General Assembly, and that a symbolic ground-breaking 
ceremony was conducted in Raleigh on October 3, 1963, at 
which members of the Commission were present. 

As regards the second major action taken at the meeting 
of the Commission, May 20, 1960, approval of the outline 
of a program in observance of the Charter Tercentenary, 
mention should be made of certain important premises 
adopted by the Commission. The first of these was a deci- 
sion to include in the scope of the celebration the first cen- 
tury of the Colony's official existence, that is the period 
1663-1763. Since the Carolina Charter of 1663 was issued to 
the eight Lords Proprietors by King Charles II at Westmin- 
ster in England, and since permanent settlement of "Albe- 
marle County" had already gradually begun prior to that 
year, no suitable geographic focal point for the Tercentenary 



Introduction 3 

was available in North Carolina. Extending the period of 
the celebration to 1763 permitted a broader selection of 
events for commemoration on a State-wide basis, settlement 
having reached the Blue Ridge Mountains by the latter 
date. Furthermore, the end of the first century of the Col- 
ony's life coincides with the termination of the French and 
Indian War, which many historians regard as the end of the 
Colonial period and the beginning of the national phase of 
American history. Finally, the adoption of the period 1663- 
1763 as the scope of the present observance paved the way 
for the celebration of the bicentennial of the American 
Revolution a few years hence. 

Another determination made by the Commission at the 
May, 1960, meeting was that a number of committees should 
be formed to develop plans in various fields of activity. It 
was also decided to include in these groups qualified per- 
sons not members of the Commission and to designate these 
individuals as associate members. Subsequently, some 150 
associate members were recruited to augment the efforts of 
the regular members of the Commission and were organized 
into six functional committees. These groups were assigned 
responsibility for formulating plans for programs in the 
Arts; Commemorative Events; Schools, Colleges and Univer- 
sities; Religious Activities; and Scholarly Activities. The 
accomplishments of these committees and of the Commis- 
sion's fund-raising group are outlined in subsequent pages. 



The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 




GOVERNOR AND MRS. TERRY SANFORD LEAD THE PROCESSION OF COSTUMED 
OFFICIALS AT CEREMONIES HELD JANUARY 4 AT THE EXECUTIVE MANSION TO 

inaugurate the year-long observance. (Photo by Madlin Futrell) 



CHAPTER II 

Formulating the Tercentenary Program 

In setting about the development of an over-all plan for ob- 
servance of the Tercentenary, the Commission took careful 
note of the experience of other States in similar programs. 
The official reports of the tercentenary celebrations of Mary- 
land, 1934; and Connecticut, 1936; and the Virginia three 
hundred and fiftieth anniversary, 1957, were scrutinized. As 
was noted in the preceding chapter, no suitable focus in 
terms of time or geography offered itself for a year-long ob- 
servance of North Carolina's Tercentenary. In this respect 
the State was less fortunate than Virginia with its James- 
town, Massachusetts with its Plymouth Rock, or Maryland 
with its Saint Mary's Island. Moreover, the slow settlement 
of the Albemarle, beginning as it did years prior to 1663, 
contrasted with the precisely dated initial landings in the 
colonies mentioned. For these reasons, as has been stated, 
the Commission decided to adopt the period 1663-1763 as 
the chronological basis for its planning. 

This decision not only made it possible to include vir- 
tually all sections of the State in the observance but also 
enabled the Commission to concentrate public attention up- 
on a little-known and less understood period of North Caro- 
lina's Colonial history. Although the public is relatively well 
informed about the unsuccessful attempts by Sir Walter 
Raleigh to establish a colony on Roanoke Island in the six- 
teenth century, less is known about the events subsequent to 
the permanent settlements effected under the Charter of 
1663. The lack of understanding- of the significance of Cul- 
peper's Rebellion in the Albemarle, 1677-1679, is a case in 
point. As for events subsequent to 1763, Tarheels are usually 
aware of North Carolina's role in the struggle for American 
independence, including such developments as the Regulator 
movement, the Provincial Congresses and the Halifax Re- 
solves. 



The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 




Formulating the Tercentenary Program 7 

These considerations inclined the Commission toward the 
development of a Tercentenary program which was basically 
educational in its character. It seemed to the Commission 
that instruction of the public— and particularly the young 
people— in the heritage of their State was the single most 
important and far-reaching objective that could be adopted 
for the program. This outlook was reflected in every project 
undertaken by the Commission as will be evident in the 
accounts of the several activities committees in succeeding 
chapters of this report. The emphasis accorded the educa- 
tional features of the Tercentenary program is reflected in 
the fact that more than 70 percent of the State funds avail- 
able for the execution of the program was expended for 
projects directly concerned with education. 



CHAPTER III 

Scholarly Activities 

Following the meeting of the Commission on May 20, 
1960, a committee was organized to consider projects of a 
scholarly nature which would be appropriate for under- 
taking in conjunction with the Tercentenary. Known as 
the Committee on Scholarly Activities, the group was re- 
quested to submit recommendations to the Executive Com- 
mittee concerning such projects. The group's attentions were 
to be devoted, but not necessarily limited, to identification 
of scholarly materials for exhibition, publication, and mic- 
rofilming; development of programs of study and publica- 
tion by graduate students of North Carolina universities and 
other scholars; and selection of national and regional learned 
societies for invitation to conduct conferences and conven- 
tions in North Carolina in 1963. 

Mr. Lambert Davis and Mr. William S. Powell, both of 
Chapel Hill, were designated as co-chairmen of the Commit- 
tee on Scholarly Activities. Mr. Davis was succeeded by 
Mr. David Stick of Kitty Hawk in August, 1962, upon the 
former's resignation from the Commission. 

A series of meetings of the committee took place in 1960 
and 1961 from which stemmed two proposals that were im- 
plemented by the Commission. One of these recommenda- 
tions provided for invitations to be extended to certain 
learned societies of regional and national character to con- 
duct their annual meetings in North Carolina during 1963. 
Appropriate action was undertaken to this end with the 
result that three prominent organizations convened in the 
State in 1963 as a tribute to the Tercentenary. These were 
the American Association for State and Local History, which 
met in Raleigh, October 2, 3, and 4; the Society of Ameri- 
can Archivists which also assembled in Raleigh, October 3, 
4, and 5; and the Southern Historical Association which con- 
ducted its 1963 meeting in Asheville, November 7, 8, and 9. 

The programs of these organizations included numerous 
references to the Tercentenary and provided for participa- 



Scholarly Activities 9 

tion by members of the Commission during meetings of the 
societies. Thus, the dinner meeting of the Southern His- 
torical Association on November 8, was presided over by 
Chairman Winslow of the Commission. A program of folk 
music was presented during the dinner by Miss Julia Ribet 
of the Commission staff, and the featured speaker of the 
evening was Dr. Frank P. Graham, Chairman of the North 
Carolina Tercentenary Celebration Commission (federal 
commission) who discussed the contribution of the Carolina 
Charter of 1663 to the development of the American nation. 

Note should be taken also of the receipt of an Award of 
Merit for 1963 from the American Association for State and 
Local History, citing the Commission "For its lasting con- 
tributions to the field of Colonial North Carolina History." 

One of the Commission's lasting contributions to the 
history of the Colonial period grew out of the major recom- 
mendation of the Committee on Scholarly Activities. That 
group proposed in January, 1961, 

Initiation of a completely new edition of North Carolina Colonial 
Records with a view to publication of the first volumes during 1963. 
A modest budget for an editor and secretary assistant who should be 
procured without delay is recommended. In addition, it is estimated 
that $12,000 for FY 1962 and $18,000 for FY 1963 is required to get 
the project started. In subsequent fiscal years the project should be 
transferred to the Department of Archives and History. It is estimated 
that ten years and an over-all expenditure of perhaps S500,000 are 
required to complete this monumental and long overdue project. 

The committee's recommendation recognized the longr- 
standing need for a new and more scholarly edition of The 
Colonial Records of North Carolina. The existing version 
of the work, edited by William L. Saunders during the late 
nineteenth century, while he was serving as Secretary of 
State of North Carolina, is deficient in many respects. Futher- 
more, the work is out of print and even secondhand copies 
are scarce. 

This recommendation of the Committee on Scholarly 
Activities was adopted by the Commission on March 10, 
1961, and steps were taken to secure the necessary appropria- 



10 The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 

tion from the General Assembly which was then in session. 
On September 1, Mrs. Mattie Erma Edwards Parker of 
Raleigh was engaged as Executive Editor of the project and 
recruitment of a staff of four assistants was begun. An Ad- 
visory Editorial Board which had been authorized for the 
work by the Executive Committee of the Commission held 
its first meeting September 28. 

It was determined that the first volume of the new series 
should be prepared for publication during the Tercentenary. 
The volume would contain the charters which authorized 
Englishmen to settle territory now included in North Caro- 
lina and the constitutions in which the Lords Proprietors of 
Carolina set forth plans for governing their province. The 
volume was actually published in January, 1963, and, with 
the selectively modernized spelling, capitalization and punc- 
tuation of its text, is suitable for use by the general reader 
as well as the scholar. It is anticipated that future volumes 
will be prepared with a view to satisfying primarily the re- 
quirements of scholars. 

With the publication on schedule of the initial volume of 
the project, the development of plans for the preparation of 
subsequent volumes was intensified. Inquiries were made 
of agencies of other states which had published or were 
publishing similar collections in order to secure the benefit 
of their experience. In view of the prospective termination 
of the life of the Commission upon conclusion of the Ter- 
centenary, arrangements were made to transfer the project 
to the State Department of Archives and History effective 
January 1, 1964, in order to ensure continuation of the 
work. 

A number of other basic policies regarding the Colonial 
Records Project were adopted by the Commission. It was 
determined that the first aim of the Project is to locate, 
wherever they may be, all known documents dealing with 
Colonial North Carolina and to prepare a detailed inventory 
listing each document, its location and condition. When 
possible, efforts are to be made to have the document trans- 
ferred to a permanent depository in the North Carolina 
Archives; however, where this is not possible, photocopies 



Scholarly Activities 



11 



are to be made for such permanent storage. The more im- 
portant documents are to be edited and republished as part 
of the new Colonial Records series. 

No time was lost in setting about the inventory of possible 
repositories of pertinent documents. Searches were conducted 
in the North Carolina Archives and the libraries of the 
University of North Carolina and Duke University before 
venturing out of the state. By the end of the Tercentenary 
year inventories were completed in the following collections: 



American Philosophical Society, 

Philadelphia 
Association of the Bar Library, 

New York 
Boston Public Library 
William L. Clements Library, 

University of Michigan 
Columbia University Library 
Connecticut Historical Society 
Connecticut State Library 
Daughters of the American Revo- 
lution Library, Washington 
Folger Shakespeare Library 
Historical Society of 

Pennsylvania 
Houghton Library, Harvard 
University 



Library of Congress 
Massachusetts State Archives 
Museum of the City of New York 
National Archives 
New York Genealogical and 

Biographical Society 
New-York Historical Society 
New York Public Library 
Ohio Historical Society 
Pierpont Morgan Library, New 

York 
Pvhode Island Historical Society 
Pvhode Island State Archives 
Seaman's Church Institute, 

New York 
South Carolina Department of 

Archives 



At the end of the Tercentenary work was still in progress 
in Boston, Philadelphia, and Annapolis. Yet to be examined 
are the collections of early records in the hands of the Regis- 
ters of Deeds of the older North Carolina counties, notably 
Chowan, Hertford, and Perquimans. A conservative estimate 
of the number of documents which will be brought to light 
by the inventory in the United States alone is 500,000. Few, 
if any, of these documents have been used by historians in 
the past. 

Apart from the enormity of the task of publishing a new 
series of the Colonial Records of North Carolina, the chief 
problem confronting Mrs. Parker and her staff is the avail- 
ability of funds for the project. The following table sets forth 
the financial status of the work as of the conclusion of the 
Tercentenary. 



12 The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 

TTF1V/r FUNDS REQUIRED FUNDS AVAILABLE 

1 x tM Jan 1/64 Jul 1/64 Jan 1/64 Jul 1/64 Balance 

Jun 30/64 Jun 30/65 Total Jun 30/64 Jun 30/65 Total Required 

Salaries, staff $17,112 $55,764 $72,876 $ 5.064 $10,128 $15,192 $57,684 

Other Adminis- 
trative costs 2,500 5,000 7,500 1,500 2,600 4,100 3,400 

Operating costs: 

Research 5,000 10,000 15,000 5,000 10,000 15,000 - 

Publication - 10,000 10,000 - 5,400 5,400 4,600 

Totals $24,612 $80,764 $105,376 $11,564 $28,128 $39,692 $65,684 

The total amount, $105,376, required for the project for 
the period January 1, 1964— June 30, 1965, is considered 
minimal. Funds on hand or in sight total $39,692, or about 
38 per cent of requirements. Of the amount available for 
the project, $24,692, or only 21 percent of requirements was 
provided by the General Assembly. The Commission believes 
that no undertaking of the Tercentenary program is more 
deserving of continued public support until completion. 
North Carolina owes it to itself to assemble the source ma- 
terials which will make possible the preparation of more 
complete and more accurate history books to replace those 
now in use. The latter have, for the most part, been written 
by scholars with inadequate reference materials and, in con- 
sequence, have accorded scant recognition to North Caro- 
lina's role in the formation of the American nation. 



CHAPTER IV 



Programs in Schools, Colleges 
and Universities 



The fundamentally educational nature of the Commis- 
sion's concept of the Tercentenary observance was nowhere 
more clearly evidenced than in its programs in the State's 
schools, colleges and universities. A committee was in- 
structed to formulate plans for bringing home to students 
of these institutions the significance of the occasion. The 
group, under the co-chairmanship of Dr. Chalmers G. David- 
son of Davidson, and Dr. Paul Murray of Greenville, con- 
sidered matters such as exhibits, both* static and mobile; 
pageants, music, and dramatic programs; and publications 
and a motion picture film. 

Subcommittees were formed to deal with various projects 
which were suggested by the committee as a whole and which 
were given the approval of the entire Commission. The ac- 
tivities described in the following paragraphs resulted from 
the work of the several sub-groups. 

Historical Pamphlet Series 

During the spring of 1961 a panel of educators and in- 
terested laymen developed a list of topics relating to the 
history of North Carolina during the general period 1663- 
1763. The group recommended that the Commission under- 
take the publication of a series of pamphlets on these sub- 
jects, each to be written by an authority in the topic con- 
cerned. The result was the publication during 1962 and 1963 
of the pamphlets listed below, prepared by the authors in- 
dicated. The monographs are listed in the order in which 
they were published. 



14 The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 

Title Author 

Upheaval in Albemarle— The Story of 

Culpeper's Rebellion Hugh F. Rankin 

The Proprietors of Carolina William S. Powell 

The Five Royal Governors of 

North Carolina Blackwell P. Robinson 

Indian Wars in North Carolina E. Lawrence Lee 

The Highland Scots of North Carolina Duane Meyer 

The Influence of Georgraphy upon Early 

North Carolina Cordelia Camp 

Colonial Homes in North Carolina John V. Allcott 

Numerous other topics could have been added with bene- 
fit to the students of North Carolina's schools had funds 
been available for a longer list. In the circumstances, how- 
ever, the subcommittee concerned with the project assigned 
the foregoing pamphlets priority. Some 15,000 copies of 
each title were printed of which nearly 12,000 were dis- 
tributed to eighth-grade teachers, teachers of United States 
history, school libraries serving these grades, college and 
university libraries, and municipal and county public libra- 
ries. The balance remaining after this distribution was made 
available for sale to the general public. Only the most fav- 
orable comments regarding the publications have been re- 
ceived by the Commission. Particularly gratifying was the 
complimentary response of teachers. 

The publications described above were supplemented by 
a number of less elaborate brochures and leaflets which 
dealt with Colonial subjects felt to be of interest to primary 
and secondary school students. The most significant of these 
items was a brochure containing in readable form the text 
of the Carolina Charter of 1663. Although the original of 
this document has been on display in the Hall of History in 
Raleigh since 1951, no convenient reprint of its text in 
readable form had been available until the issuance of the 
Commission's brochure. Nearly 50,000 copies of this publica- 
tion were distributed to the public, most of them going to 
students. 

Essay Contest 

The Commission's publications stimulated great interest 
on the part of junior and senior high school students in the 



Programs in Schools, Colleges, and Universities 



15 




' 






Jm tw 



GOVERNOR TERRY SANFORD PRESENTS AWARDS TO THE FIRST-PRIZE WINNERS 
OF THE COMMISSION'S ESSAY CONTEST 

Above, Anne Cooke, Route 2, Cleveland, winner of Senior Division; 
below, John Clayton Perry, Greensboro, Junior Division winner. 



16 The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 

Essay Contest which was conducted during the spring of 
1963. Governed by rules prepared by another subcommittee 
of the Committee on Programs in Schools, Colleges and Uni- 
versities, the contest was held for two divisions of students: 
those studying North Carolina history in junior high schools 
and those studying United States history in senior high 
schools. The topic designated for the contestants of both 
categories of students was "The Carolina Charter of 1663; 
A Milestone in the Advance of Democracy." Under the 
supervision of local school authorities eliminations were 
made at the school and at the district levels. One winner 
in each division was authorized to be referred by each dis- 
trict or administrative unit to the Commission in Raleigh for 
determination of prize winners. One hundred and five papers 
were forwarded to the Commission for final judging. 

Separate panels of judges were organized by the Commis- 
sion to consider the submissions from the districts. A high 
degree of excellence was evidenced by these papers, particu- 
larly by those of the junior students. Awards as indicated 
were made to the students listed below by Governor Terry 
Sanford at a ceremony in the State Capitol on June 14, 1963. 

Senior Division 

1st Prize Anne Cooke, Route 2, Cleveland Cash Award of $250 
2nd Prize Jasper L. Cummings, Jr., Rocky Mount Cash Award of $100 
3rd Prize Martha Elaine Houck, West Jefferson Cash Award of $ 50 

Junior Division 

1st Prize John Clayton Perry, Greensboro Cash Award of $250 

2nd Prize Gloria Tucker, Winston-Salem Cash Award of $100 

3rd Prize Myra Ellen Griggs, Morganton Cash Award of $ 50 

Honorable Mention 

Margaret Connor, Catawba 
Jennifer Joselyn Ipock, Bridgeton 
Anne Lafferty, Hickory 
Arthur Tashiro, North Wilkesboro 

Mobile Museum 

One of the projects earnestly sought by the Commission as 
part of the Tercentenary program was the acquisition for 
the State Department of Archives and History of a Mobile 



Programs in Schools, Colleges, and Universities 



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18 The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 

Museum of History. Such a traveling display of exhibits and 
artifacts from the State's Hall of History had long been de- 
sired but funds for its procurement had not been available. 
The Commission, through its Committee on Finance and 
Building, which will be discussed in greater detail later in 
this report, appealed to a number of possible private in- 
dividual and corporate donors for contributions for the 
desired vehicle. Its efforts were crowned with success at 
length when on March 27, 1963, Mr. Charles B. Wade, Jr., 
Vice-President of the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, 
presented a check for $35,000 to Governor Terry Sanford 
for the purchase and equipping of a mobile museum. At 
the presentation ceremony also was Mr. P. C. Loehr, Zone 
Manager for the Chevrolet Division of General Motors Cor- 
poration, who agreed to provide gratis an automotive trac- 
tor to tow the vehicle. 

The equipment was presented to the State Department 
of Archives and History in ceremonies presided over by 
Governor Sanford in Raleigh on June 11, 1963. The equip- 
ment has visited 25 communities in various parts of the state 
since its acquisition and has proved to be a most valuable 
addition to the resources of the Hall of History. It is esti- 
mated that 1.2 million school children will have an oppor- 
tunity to view the exhibits of the Mobile Museum of His- 
tory during the next decade. 

Tercentenary Motion Picture 

In October, 1961, discussions were begun with the De- 
partment of Radio, Television and Motion Pictures of the 
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, looking to the 
production of a documentary-type film for exhibition in 
the State's schools beginning in 1963. Several conferences 
were held during the succeeding months among the Univer- 
sity representatives and members of the subcommittee of the 
Commission's Committee on Programs in Schools, Colleges, 
and Universities concerned with the project. Agreement was 
reached on the content of the film and initiation of produc- 
tion was tentatively set for June, 1962, with a view to re- 
leasing the film in March, 1963. 



Programs in Schools, Colleges, and Universities 19 

A reorganization of the University's Department of Radio, 
Television and Motion Pictures in the spring of 1962, how- 
ever, altered the capability of that organization to continue 
work on the project. About the same time a new State 
agency, the North Carolina Film Board, was established in 
Raleigh under the direction of Mr. James Beveridge. The 
Film Board agreed in July, 1962, to undertake the Commis- 
sion's film project as its first production and work was re- 
sumed in the early autumn of that year. 

Technical difficulties inherent in producing a film for 
which relatively little of the subject matter was available 
for photographing were compounded by problems incident 
to the start-up of a new organization. Nevertheless, a 
rough cut of the film was finished and was previewed by the 
Commission's Executive Committee on July 18, 1963. Fur- 
ther delays ensued in completing the graphic materials, 
editing the film to the desired length of approximately 30 
minutes, and adding musical background and narration. It 
was not until December 4, 1963, that a finished print of 
the film was available for acceptance. 

Fifteen copies of the Commission's film, which is entitled 
"The Road to Carolina," will be deposited with the State 
Department of Archives and History for distribution to 
viewing organizations. The Commission has requested that 
priority be given to requests from schools for the loan of 
copies. 

Campus Activities 

The Commission's efforts in publishing materials, con- 
ducting an essay contest, procuring a mobile museum, and 
producing a motion picture were paralleled by programs 
conceived and executed by individual schools and college- 
level institutions throughout the State. These activities, 
which were literally innumerable, included pageants, and 
musical and dramatic programs. They reflected the imagina- 
tion and initiative of the individuals, usually history teach- 
ers, who promoted them. There can be no question but 
that through these programs the student population of the 
State was made more aware of North Carolina's heritage 
during the Tercentenary. 



20 The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 

J.'. *yf« «"\*1* t» 




Programs in Schools, Colleges, and Universities 21 

While space will not permit a complete account of the 
activities of all of North Carolina's schools in observance of 
the Tercentenary, mention should be made of the contribu- 
tion of the student band of East Carolina College. This 
115-member organization performed in the District of 
Columbia Stadium in Washington during the half-time in- 
termission of a professional football game on October 13, 
1963. The band's maneuvers depicted in symbolic form 
events associated with the Tercentenary and were viewed by 
a nation-wide television audience numbering many mil- 
lions. 



CHAPTER V 

Arts 

A Committee on the Arts, with Mrs. J. O. Tally, Jr., of 
Fayetteville as Chairman, was organized to plan a program 
in the field of the fine arts, music and literature. Subcom- 
mittees were formed to consider projects in each of these 
areas. Recommendations for projects were developed by 
these groups and submitted to the Commission in March, 
1961. Subsequently the Commission approved proposals 
for the projects discussed in the succeeding paragraphs of 
this chapter. 

Art Exhibit 

It was determined that an art exhibition of superior qual- 
ity should be held under the auspices of the Commission. 
One part of the exhibit would be concerned with English 
art of the seventeenth century while another section would 
seek to illustrate 100 years of Colonial art, with emphasis on 
the South and, wherever possible, on North Carolina. 

With the active co-operation of the subcommittee co- 
chairmen, Dr. Joseph C. Sloane, Director of the Ackland 
Art Center, Chapel Hill, and Dr. Justus Bier, Director of 
the North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, and their re- 
spective staffs, plans were completed for the project. The 
exhibition was conducted in the North Carolina Museum of 
Art in Raleigh, March 23-April 28, 1963, and featured 
128 separate outstanding examples of paintings, sculpture, 
silverware, furniture and other artifacts of the period. 

In addition to the resources of the North Carolina Museum 
of Art, items borrowed from more than 50 other private 
and public art repositories were put on display. Among the 
more unusual examples of such loans were original por- 
traits of four of the Lords Proprietors of Carolina which 
were obtained from the National Portrait Gallery in Lon- 
don and from a private resident of the British capital. These 
loans were made possible through the personal intervention 
of the Honorable Dean Rusk, United States Secretary of 



Arts 23 

State, which in turn was secured through the North Carolina 
Tercentenary Celebration Commission (federal commis- 
sion) . 

More than 14,000 persons visited the Tercentenary Art 
Exhibit, an increase of about one-third above the number 
of visitors to the museum during the comparable period of 
1962. The Commission considers that the project was highly 
successful and that it demonstrated the significant heritage 
of North Carolina in the field of the fine arts. 

Literary Competition 

The Commission approved a recommendation to conduct 
a literary contest with awards to be made for outstanding 
works of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Entries were limited 
to those dealing with a topic related to North Carolina his- 
tory during the period 1663-1763. A panel of noted North 
Carolina literary figures was requested to draft rules for the 
competition which was restricted to natives and residents 
of North Carolina. 

Notice of the competition was published in the public 
press at the beginning of 1962. In addition, various literary 
groups in the State were notified by circular letters and by 
talks delivered at their meetings by members of the Com- 
mission and its staff. A deadline for submissions was estab- 
lished as June 30, 1963. 

Response to the Commission's invitation to participate in 
its literary competition was somewhat limited. Although pro- 
vision had been made for awards in four categories, namely: 
prose fiction, prose nonfiction, poetry and drama, entries 
having sufficient quality for consideration by the distin- 
guished panel of judges were confined only to the prose 
fiction and poetry divisions. 

In October, 1963, announcement was made of the win- 
ners in these two divisions of the competition: 

Prose Fiction— Manly Wade Wellman, 

Chapel Hill Cash Award of $1,000 

Poetry— Sam Ragan, Raleigh and 

Thad Stem, Jr., Oxford (jointly) Cash Award of $ 500 

Mrs. John H. Hamilton, Jr., Cary Honorable Mention 



24 The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 

Awards were conferred upon tne winners during the annual 
meeting of the North Carolina Literary and Historical Asso- 
ciation in Raleigh, December 6, 1963. 

Music and Performing Arts 

The recommendations of the Committee on the Arts in 
the field of the performing arts had exceptional merit and 
reflected a commendable zeal on the part of those who for- 
mulated them. Nevertheless they were considered to re- 
quire financial support exceeding that which might reason- 
ably be expected to be available to the Commission. It was 
decided, therefore, to sponsor composition of an original 
musical work for symphony orchestra. It was hoped that the 
composer would derive inspiration for his work from a 
consideration of the events of the Tercentenary period. 

Mr. Hunter Johnson, a noted North Carolina composer, 
was commissioned by the Carolina Charter Corporation, 
acting for the Commission, for the task. Mr. Johnson pro- 
duced a work which embodied to an outstanding degree the 
objectives of the Commission. The composition is entitled 
North State and is a work for full symphony orchestra re- 
quiring 13 to 15 minutes to play. The work is programed in 
three parts as follows: 

I. Introduction and Celebration One 
II. Three Interludes: The Colonists 

1. Westward the Unknown: A Prayer 

2. Land Bright with Sun and Birds 

3. Simple Lives, Often Lonely 
III. Celebration Two: A Dance 

North State was given its premiere performance at Dur- 
ham, April 22, 1963, by the North Carolina Symphony un- 
der the direction of Dr. Benjamin Swalin. The work was 
given other performances later by Dr. Swalin as well as by 
other musical organizations in the State during the Tercen- 
tenary. Copies of the conductor's score have been deposited 
in the State Archives in Raleigh, and with the music depart- 
ments of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and 
at Greensboro, East Carolina College and Appalachian State 
Teachers College. 



Arts 25 

"The Sojourner and Mollie Sinclair" 

The Commission also approved the production of a music 
drama and a dance drama, both to be based upon the history 
of the Tercentenary period, provided adequate financial 
support from private sources could be obtained for one or 
both projects. After extensive investigation it was apparent 
that undertaking both projects would exceed the Commis- 
sion's capabilities. It was decided, therefore, to proceed only 
with the production of an original music drama designed 
for presentation on television. This medium would, it was 
felt, assure a maximum dissemination of the work among 
the population of the State and could lead to eventual na- 
tional exposure. 

Late in 1962, through the good offices of Mr. Donald Sea- 
well, formerly of Raleigh, now a New York attorney and 
theatrical producer, arrangements were entered into be- 
tween the Carolina Charter Corporation and Boosey and 
Hawkes, Incorporated, agents and publishers for Mr. Car- 
lisle Floyd, native of South Carolina and distinguished 
American composer of opera. Mr. Floyd agreed to compose 
the desired work for presentation late in 1963 and, after 
some months of research, selected as his text an episode con- 
cerning the migration of the Highland Scots to the Cape 
Fear River region in North Carolina during the first half 
of the eighteenth century. 

In November, 1962, also, Dr. Leo W. Jenkins, President of 
East Carolina College, agreed to the production of the work 
by the School of Music and the Department of Drama of that 
institution. An orchestra and singers for the supporting roles 
and the chorus were to be provided from among students 
supplemented as necessary by faculty members. The Com- 
mission was to secure the services of two professional singers 
for the leading roles and of a conductor. Miss Patricia Neway 
and Mr. Norman Treigle were engaged for the principal 
singing parts, and Mr. Julius Rudel, director of the New 
York City Opera, was engaged as conductor. 

Despite the limited amount of time for rehearsals and the 
difficulty of the music, preparation proceeded at an intensive 
pace under the supervision of Dr. Paul Gene Strassler, direc- 



26 



The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 




.3 X, 
U £ 



Arts 27 

tor of East Carolina Opera Theater and Mr. Edgar R. Loes- 
sin, director of East Carolina Playhouse, who staged the 
work, utilizing a set designed by Mr. John A. Sneden. 

The Sojourner and Mollie Sinclair was given its premiere 
performance before an audience in the Raleigh Little 
Theater December 2, 1963. The work was most warmly re- 
ceived by the opening night audience as well as by those 
who attended the performances on December 3 and 4. Press 
reviews were uniformly favorable in their appreciation of 
the music drama. 

Following the performances in the theater, the company 
was transferred to the studio of WUNC-TV in Raleigh where 
a video tape of the work was made under the direction of 
Mr. Loessin. The television production was superb in the 
quality of its sound and was technically excellent in every 
way, far surpassing the Commission's hopes in this respect. 
The work was presented by 11 of the 13 North Carolina 
television stations during the latter part of December. The 
Commission considers this project to be the capstone of its 
Tercentenary program. 



CHAPTER VI 

Religious Activities 

The Commission recognized the importance of the role 
of religion as a motivating force in the colonization of North 
Carolina. It decided that steps should be taken to encourage 
observance of the Tercentenary by church groups through- 
out the State. A Committee on Religious Activities, there- 
fore, was organized with the Right Reverend Thomas H. 
Wright, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of East Carolina, 
as its Chairman. Representatives of all religious communions 
were appointed to the group which began formulating meas- 
ures to be taken by churches and religious organizations to 
bring the objectives and programs of the Tercentenary to the 
attention of their members so as to ensure their support. 

In order to assist clergymen in the task of emphasizing the 
contribution of the Carolina Charter of 1663 and the early 
history of the Colony to establishing and strengthening of 
the concept of religious freedom, informational materials 
were prepared by the Committee. These materials consisted 
of historical data for denominational groups which had 
significant existence in North Carolina during the period 
1663-1763, and an essay on the religious implications of the 
Charter of 1663. 

With the co-operation of the religious organizations and 
ministerial associations of the State, these tracts were widely 
distributed and clergymen put them to good use in develop- 
ing sermons, addresses and informal talks. Special advantage 
was taken of the fact that March 24, 1963, the actual anni- 
versary date of the issue of the Charter, fell on Sunday. 

The religious aspects of the Tercentenary were not, how- 
ever, confined to sermons and other forms of preaching. The 
clergy and laymen throughout the State developed com- 
memorative exercises which were characterized by effective- 
ness and popular participation. In the paragraphs below a 
few of these programs are described in order to provide some 
insight into their scope and variety. 



Religious Activities 29 

At Bath, Beaufort County, on March 24, the Rt. Rev. 
Thomas H. Wright, Commission member and Bishop of the 
Diocese of East Carolina, conducted a Forefathers Service 
at historic St. Thomas Episcopal Church. The Prayer Book 
used was printed during the reign of Charles II in 1662 and 
was once used in St. George's Chapel in Windsor Castle. 
A coffee hour was held in the Old Glebe House following 
the service. Also part of the day's activities was a concert by 
the Washington High School Band, playing selections in 
keeping with the theme of the Tercentenary. 

On the same date, in North Wilkesboro, Wilkes County, 
at the First Methodist Church, the Rev. Lee R. Spencer 
preached the morning sermon on "Life, Liberty and Basic 
Freedoms." The provisions in the Carolina Charter for 
religious tolerance were the key to the message. An original 
anthem, "A Heritage Strong," written by Mr. H. Grady 
Reagan, Director of Music, for the Tercentenary observance, 
was performed by the church choir. Two articles in the 
church bulletin explained the history of the period and 
circumstances surrounding the granting of the Charter. 

Two months later, on June 22, at Snow Camp in Alamance 
County, over 200 persons gathered at the Cane Creek Meet- 
ing House to commemorate the period of settlement, 1663- 
1763. Mr. Holt McPherson, Editor of the High Point En- 
terprise, addressed the group on the grounds of the oldest 
Quaker church in the State. Colonial costumes and displays 
were prominent. Also on the program were the Rev. C. 
Kenneth Wood, Pastor of Cane Creek Meeting House, Mr. 
Seth B. Hinshaw, Executive Secretary of the Yearly Meet- 
ing of Friends, Dr. Algie I. Newman, Guilford College, and 
Dr. Clyde A. Milner, President of Guilford College. 

On October 13, at Williamsboro, Vance County, the an- 
nual meeting of the Friends of St. John's Church was held 
in tribute to the Tercentenary. The Rt. Rev. Richard H. 
Baker, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina, 
conducted a service in St. John's, the oldest colonial Episco- 
pal building in his diocese, in accordance with the Order of 
Worship in use during the first 100 years of North Carolina 



30 The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 

history. Following the service and a picnic in the vicinity of 
the church, the Honorable Francis E. Winslow, Commission 
Chairman, spoke to the gathering on the history and back- 
ground of the Charter. 



CHAPTER VII 

Local Commemorative Observances 

A Committee on Commemorative Events was established to 
develop plans for the encouragement of programs of ob- 
servance commemorating appropriate events which occurred 
during the period of establishment and consolidation of 
Colonial Carolina. Under the guidance of Mesdames Inglis 
Fletcher and Harry McMullan initially, and later of the 
Honorable J. V. Whitfield, measures were taken for obtain- 
ing the support and participation of historical, patriotic, 
and civic organizations. Observances were to be festive or 
serious in character as the event to be commemorated re- 
quired; they would include both regional and central func- 
tions such as fairs, pageants, receptions, dinners, socials, 
ceremonies, resolutions by the General Assembly and other 
suitable activities. 

A network of civic leaders was organized throughout the 
State with one individual being designated County Repre- 
sentative in each of the participating counties. These leaders 
were urged to organize local committees comprising mem- 
bers of civic and patriotic organizations, teachers, clergy- 
men and other professional persons. County representatives 
and members of their groups were supplied with literature 
and other materials designed to assist them in the formula- 
tion of their plans. 

By the beginning of the Tercentenary, in January, 1963, 
a total of 87 of North Carolina's 100 counties had designated 
County Representatives and were participating in the year- 
long observance. Local programs varied widely from one 
community to another. Some were simple tree-planting exer- 
cises in the local schoolyard. One observance, in Watauga 
County, lasted three days and included a wagon trek by 200 
persons who re-enacted Daniel Boone's crossing of the Blue 
Ridge, circa 1769. A partial list of activities conducted in 
one or more of the local celebrations follows: 



32 The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 

Public proclamation with Exhibits of relics, antiques 

appropriate ceremony Colonial art and artifacts 

Marking old houses, buildings, Carnivals 

churches with date of erection Parade with floats 

Construction of replicas of settlers' Tableaux 

houses and Indian dwellings Plays 

Exhibition of examples of work Eolk dancing 

of early local craftsmen Musicales 

Markers for historic places, events Tree Planting 

Contests— agricultural, cooking, etc. Publication of history 

Meetinghouse service (costume) Cemetery markers 

As the number of County Representatives increased, it was 
thought advisable to group them in geographic districts 
which would facilitate attendance at regional meetings and 
workshops. During 1961, therefore, five districts were es- 
tablished, each comprising from 12 to 27 counties and each 
under the supervision of a District Chief. District I included 
the 12 present-day counties which once constituted the Albe- 
marle. District II was composed of 26 counties comprehend- 
ing the southeastern quarter of the State. District III, 27 
counties in number, included the Piedmont region. District 
IV comprised 23 Mountain counties in the western part of 
the State. Twelve counties centered in the area of Wake 
were grouped into District V. 

In 1961 and 1962 frequent meetings were held at var- 
ious points in the State attended by the staff of the Com- 
mission in order to counsel the County Representatives and 
afford them an opportunity to compare programs with each 
other. How well this program of public education at the 
grass roots succeeded may be determined from a review of 
the activities sponsored by the local groups concerning 
which information is on file in the Commission's records. 
It should be understood that a quite considerable number 
of local observances were conducted throughout the State 
without any report being made. Consequently, the follow- 
ing summary of activities must be regarded as partial and 
incomplete. In this recapitulation, counties are listed alpha- 
betically under the Districts to which assigned. 



Local Commemorative Observances 33 

District I— L. S. Blades, Jr., Elizabeth City, Chief. 

BERTIE COUNTY— MISS STELLA PHELPS, WOODVILLE, REPRESEN- 
TATIVE. 

November 1 & 2, Windsor. Governor Terry Sanford, Miss 
North Carolina, Congressman Herbert C. Bonner, Mr. 
Ted Davis, State Travel Bureau, and Gen. John D. F. 
Phillips were among the dignitaries present for the 
celebration. The festivities included an art exhibit by 
Bertie artist, Francis Speight; a parade using mobile 
display units of historical items and theme; a pageant 
depicting the building of the Nathaniel Batts house (the 
earliest known cabin of a permanent settler in North 
Carolina) ; a tour of historical points of interest and 
old homes; and an antique show by dealers throughout 
eastern North Carolina. Merchants in Windsor decorated 
their store windows with items of historic interest. Mer- 
chants, employees and hostesses on the tour dressed in 
costume of the colonial period. 

CAMDEN COUNTY— JESSE F. PUGH, OLD TRAP, REPRESENTATIVE. 

May 5, South Mills. The Rev. E. F. Moseley, rector of Holy 
Trinity Episcopal Church in Hertford, conducted a com- 
memorative service at the McBride Methodist Church, 
site of the first sanctuary, erected in 1715, for a congrega- 
tion of the Established Church. 

CHOWAN COUNTY— DAVID WARREN, EDENTON, REPRESENTATIVE. 

April 6, Edenton. The First Day of Issue ceremonies for 
the Carolina Charter Commemorative Stamp were held 
in the historical town incorporated in 1722, which served 
as the Colony's unofficial capital for more than 40 years. 
Appearing on the program were Commission Chairman 
Francis E. Winslow, Congressman Herbert C. Bonner, 
Senator B. Everett Jordan, and Postmaster General, 
J. Edward Day. 

April 19, 20, and 21, Edenton. The Woman's Club spon- 
sored the biennial Pilgrimage of Colonial Edenton and 
Countryside. Twenty-two homes, plantations and historic 
shrines were open to the public. Nearly half of the Houses 



34 The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 

and Public buildings were erected between 1663 and 1763. 
A showing of crafts of the era was held and water front 
tours were conducted daily on the Albemarle Sound. 

CURRITUCK COUNTY--WILTON WALKER, JR., CURRITUCK, REPRE- 
SENTATIVE. 

Summer, 1963, Currituck and Dare County. The Public 
Library serving the two counties awarded a certificate for 
the "North Carolina Tercentenary Summer Reading Pro- 
gram" upon completion of reading fifteen approved books 
by the recipient. The certificate was styled after the Char- 
ter. 

DARE COUNTY— AYCOCK BROWN, MANTEO, REPRESENTATIVE. 

January 5, Rodanthe. A proclamation dedicating the cele- 
bration to the Tercentenary was read as a part of the an- 
nual "Old Christmas" festivities on the Outer Banks. 

June 29, Manteo. Andy Griffith, entertainer, dedicated the 
opening performance of "The Lost Colony" outdoor 
drama to the 300th anniversary observance. The Mobile 
Museum of History made its maiden appearance on this 
occasion. 

MARTIN COUNTY— ELBERT S. PEEL, WILLIAMSTON, REPRESENTA- 
TIVE. 

April 24, Williamston. A colonial tea and display of an- 
tiques was sponsored by the Historical Society and friends 
of the local libraries. Refreshments were tea cakes and 
colonial punch served with napkins bearing the dates 1663- 
1763 by young ladies dressed in colonial costume. Enter- 
tainment included the showing of three color movies de- 
picting life and customs of colonial days. Handpainted 
decorations included symbols of the State, a replica of the 
Carolina Charter, a picture of King Charles, and an ar- 
rangement of flowers and shrubs typical of those grown 
during the early American period. 

PASQUOTANK COUNTY— POTTER DIXON, ELIZABETH CITY, REPRE- 
SENTATIVE. 

December 10 (1962), Elizabeth City. Mis* Julia Ribet of 
the Charter Commission spoke to a joint meeting of the 



Local Commemorative Observances 35 

Musical Tempo Club and the Pasquotank Historical So- 
ciety. 

March 23 & 24, Elizabeth City. The annual Camellia Show 
featured the Tercentenary theme in categories of arrange- 
ments pertaining to the colonial period. 

April 15, Elizabeth City. A Tercentenary silver tea honored 
the 300th anniversary of the Carolina Charter of 1663. 

April 17 & 18, Elizabeth City. The Albemarle Craftsman's 
Show displayed exhibits of colonial crafts and products. 

April 24, Camden. The Home Demonstrations Clubs spon- 
sored a program of colonial costumes and songs directed 
by Mrs. John Hurdle. 

PERQUIMANS COUNTY— MRS. EMMETT WINSLOW, HERTFORD, 
REPRESENTATIVE. 

April 19-21, Hertford. Weekend festivities included a court- 
room drama, colonial fish dinner, and a historical exhibit. 
Hon. Francis E. Winslow, Chairman of the Charter Com- 
mission, presided as Judge for the drama, "Perquiman's 
First One-Hundred Years." Dinner and colonial dances 
were held in the Court House Square. 

April 21, Phelps Point. A commemoration of the first re- 
ligious service in Proprietary Carolina was conducted. 

TYRELL COUNTY— MRS. C. EARL COHOON, COLUMBIA, REPRESEN- 
TATIVE. 

August 10, Columbia. Hon. Herbert C. Bonner, representa- 
tive in Congress from the 1st North Carolina District, 
was the guest speaker at the American Legion Annual 
Picnic, the Scuppernong Post's 35th anniversary and Ter- 
centenary observance. On display were maps showing the 
original Tyrrell County boundary line in 1729 and the 
shore line boundary 300 years ago. Members of the Boy 
Scout Troop No. 94 enacted an Indian scene. A basket 
dinner was served. 

October 24 & 25, Columbia. The county representative sup- 
plied the pattern for a replica of the Tercentenary symbol 
to the students of Tyrrell High School. The symbol top- 
ped the list of school exhibits in art at the New Farmers 
of America Fair. 



36 The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 

Tercentenary publications were distributed to the high 
school and a $5.00 prize was offered for the best essay on 
the colonial period of 1663-1763. 

WASHINGTON COUNTY— MRS. SIDNEY WARD, SR., PLYMOUTH, 
REPRESENTATIVE. 

May 18, Plymouth. Mrs. Laura S. Johnston featured the Ter- 
centenary in a candlelight piano recital. Participants wore 
colonial costume. 

District II— Hon. J. V. Whitfield, Wallace, Chief. 

BEAUFORT COUNTY— MRS. HEWRY R. SWARTZELL, WASHINGTON, 
REPRESENTATIVE. 

January 23, Washington. Col. C. Wingate Reed addressed 
the Pamlico Committee of the National Society of Colon- 
ial Dames in the State of North Carolina on the topic of 
their organization. 

February 20, Washington. Hon. J. Vivian Whitfield addres- 
sed the Major Reading Blount Chapter of the Daughters 
of the American Revolution on "Our Heritage." 

March 24, Bath. A band concert and Forefathers Service was 
conducted at St. Thomas' Church. 

March 25, Washington. A proclamation was read by the 
Mayor from the Court House steps noting the commemora- 
tion of the Tercentenary. 

March 25-April 25, Washington. An exhibit in observance 
of the Tercentenary was displayed in Brown Memorial 
Library. 

March 25-April 25, Belhaven. The Fanny Mebane Memor- 
ial Library displayed an exhibit pertaining to the colonial 
period. 

March 27-29, Washington. The Garden Clubs planted six 
"Charter Oaks" at the city school. 

May 7, Washington. Mrs. Henry Swartzell spoke on the Caro- 
lina Charter to the Woman's Club. 



Local Commemorative Observances 37 

BRUNSWICK COUNTY— MRS. M. HENDERSON ROURK, SHALLOTTE, 
REPRESENTATIVE. 

September 8, Old Brunswick Town. Dr. E. Lawrence Lee 
was the guest speaker at ceremonies commemorating the 
Spanish Attack of 1747 and Groundbreaking for the 
Brunswick Town Visitor Center. Home & Garden Tours 
were conducted in Southport. Colonial Buildings were 
featured. 

CARTERET COUNTY— F. C. SALISBURY, MOREHEAD CITY, REPRE- 
SENTATIVE. 

A half-hour slide program with narration was compiled by 
the representative and presented to the following organiza- 
tions on various occasions during 1963: Junior Woman's 
Club; Lower Cape Fear Historical Society, Wilmington; 
Jacksonville Rotary Club; Emeritus Club; Carteret County 
Historical Society, with the Atlantic High School history 
class as guests; The Lanier Book Club; Newport Rotary 
Club; the two 8th grades of the Morehead City Grade School, 
and the Business and Professional Club. 

Miss Ruth Peeling, editor of the Carteret County News- 
Times wrote a play entitled, "Blackbeard, Raider of the 
Carolina Seas" which was published in the November 22 is- 
sue of that periodical. 

COLUMBUS COUNTY— MRS. LESLIE THOMPSON, WHITEVILLE, 
REPRESENTATIVE. 

January, 1963, Whiteville. Dr. Chalmers G. Davidson, Com- 
mission member, addressed the stockholders of the Wac- 
camaw Bank and Trust Co., using the Carolina Charter 
of 1663 as his theme. 

March 2, Whiteville. The High School planted a liveoak 
tree symbolizing the opening of activities in the county. 

June 11, Whiteville. The Junior Woman's Club held a com- 
memorative program. 

CRAVEN COUNTY— W. L. FLOWERS, NEW BERN, REPRESENTATIVE. 

April 9, New Bern. Tryon Palace Commission luncheon 
honoring Tercentenary. Hon. Francis E. Winslow, Chair- 
man of the Commission was guest speaker. 



38 The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 

CUMBERLAND COUNTY— GEORGE B. HERNDON, FAYETTEVILLE, 
REPRESENTATIVE. 

May 1-9, Fayetteville. The Fine Arts Committee of the 
Fayetteville Junior Chamber of Commerce dedicated the 
Festival of the Arts, held annually by Fayetteville and 
Cumberland County, to the Tercentenary. 

February, Fayetteville. Mrs. Scott Shepherd was guest speaker 
at the meeting of the Cumberland County Committee of 
Colonial Dames. 

April 23, Fayetteville. Miss Julia Ribet of the Charter 
Commission spoke to a group of Methodist College Stu- 
dents. 

May 18, Fayetteville. Betty Vaiden Wright Williams gave 
a program for the Woman's Club which included Ter- 
centenary Folk Songs. 

September, Fayetteville. The Chaminade Music Club dedi- 
cated its monthly program to the 300th anniversary with 
music of the colonial period. 

October 5 & 6, Fayetteville. The Garden Council Fall 
Flower Show paid tribute to the Tercentenary. 

October 10, Fayetteville. Dr. A. I. Newlin of Guilford Col- 
lege spoke to the Lion's Club on the Carolina Charter. 

DUPLIN COUNTY— F. W. MCGOWEN, KENANSVILLE, REPRESENTA- 
TIVE. 

December 3, (1962), Kenansville. A resolution was adopted 
by the Board of County Commissioners for the observance 
of the Tercentenary. 

May 7, Rose Hill, Flower show and heritage display spon- 
sored by the Woman's Club. 

November 13, Faison. The representative spoke to the Sesame 
Woman's Club regarding county government from 1663 
to the present. Pamphlets were distributed. 

December 9, Rose Hill. The representative spoke to the 
Rose Hill PTA on "A Look at Our Public Schools from 
1663 to the Present." 

Pamphlets were distributed to the Wallace Woman's Club 
by Mrs. Winifred T. Wells. 



Local Commemorative Observances 39 

HOKE COUNTY— MRS. T. B. UPCHURCH, RAEFORD, REPRESENTA- 
TIVE. 

March, Hoke County. Hymns from the colonial period were 
used in church services throughout the county. 

May 5, Raeford. A concert was given by the U. S. Army Band 
sponsored by the Chaminade Music Club and County Ter- 
centenary committee. 

May 27, Raeford. A tree-planting ceremony was held on the 
grounds of the Hoke High School. The tree was named 
the "Charter Oak." 

September 27, Raeford. Miss Julia Ribet of the Charter Com- 
mission spoke to the annual teacher banquet of the 
Woman's Club. 

November 20, Hoke County. Home Demonstration clubs 
held a luncheon at the Hoke Community Center using 
colonial receipts. 

History classes in the high school received special instruc- 
tion on the Charter and the colonial period. Information 
on the Tercentenary was displayed in the Chamber of 
Commerce office. Orders were taken there for Tercenten- 
ary souvenirs. 

LENOIR COUNTY— MRS. J. A. JONES, KINSTON, REPRESENTATIVE. 

September, Kinston. The Worthwhile Club chose the cen- 
tury of history being celebrated during the Tercentenary 
for its year-long study. 

October. Kinston. Mrs. Elizabeth Copeland of Greenville 
presented a program about North Carolina heritage and 
the Tercentenary at a meeting of the Booklovers Club. 

MOORE COUNTY— GEORGE R. ROSS, JACKSON SPRINGS, REPRESEN- 
TATIVE. 

September 29 (1962), Pinehurst. Robert C. Page, III of the 
Charter Commission, addressed the North Carolina As- 
sociation of Realtors. 

April 30, Pinehurst. The North Carolina Automobile Deal- 
ers Association convention featured a Tercentenary Break- 
fast. Governor Sanford, principal speaker; Edmund Hard- 
ing, Master of Ceremonies. The event was arranged by 



40 The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 

Mrs. L. Y. Ballentine, Executive Secretary of the NCADA 
and member of the federal commission. Colonial cos- 
tumes were worn by the dignitaries and guests. 

Dr. Hugh T. LeHer, noted North Carolina historian, spoke 
to the Annual Spring meeting of the Moore County His- 
torical Association, Tavern Hall, Southern Pines, on the 
topic of the early history of North Carolina. 

"A Carolina Charter and Tercentenary Course" was pre- 
sented to the Moore County Chapter of the Daughters of 
the American Revolution at the home of Mrs. H. W. 
Doub, Aberdeen. 

The Shaw House in Southern Pines and Alstair House in 
Deep River were made available to local clubs meeting 
in connection with the Carolina Charter Tercentenary. 

A display was arranged in the public library exhibiting the 
Indian relics collection of Mr. C. McAuly. 

NEW HANOVER COUNTY— WILLIAM G. BROADFOOT, JR., WIL- 
MINGTON, REPRESENTATIVE. 

Wilmington College Thalian group presented the "Prince 
of Parthia," first play completed (1759) in the colonies. 

The St. John's Art Gallery in Wilmington distributed ma- 
terials pertaining to the colonial period to visitors in 
March. 

ONSLOW COUNTY— REV. TUCKER LITTLETON, SWANSBORO, REPRE- 
SENTATIVE. 

January, Jacksonville. The Onslow County Public Library 
issued a special annotated bibliography. 

January 20, Jacksonville. The Onslow County Public Libr- 
ary and County Tercentenary Committee co-sponsored 
a folk song musicale by the Jacksonville High School Girls' 
Chorus. Folk songs of the Charter period were featured. 
An art exhibit by Elmer and lone Griese of Richlands 
was held dealing with subjects of Onslow County history. 

February, Jacksonville. The Rotary Club heard an illus- 
trated lecture on the Lords Proprietors and the Charter. 

March, Jacksonville and Swansboro. A proclamation was 
read by the mayor noting the commemoration of the 300th 
anniversary of the Charter. 



Local Commemorative Observances 41 

March 22, Onslow County. A special edition of a weekly 
paper, The White Oak Scene was devoted to the Ter- 
centenary. 

March 24, Onslow County. The Garden Clubs placed spe- 
cial flower arangements in all the churches. 

October 12, Swansboro. The Swansboro Historical Associa- 
tion opened exhibits in the Ringware House following 
the Annual Mullet Festival. 

November 21, Jacksonville. The Rev. Tucker Littleton spoke 
to the Joseph Montford Chapter, Daughters of the Ameri- 
can Revolution, on the Tercentenary and historical events 
of the county's first 100 years. 

December 4, Swansboro. Formal opening of the Swansboro 
Historical Museum in commemoration of the county's 
232nd birthday and the Tercentenary. 

Three exhibits were presented to the Swansboro Historical 
Association: Indian artifacts, a martime exhibit and a 
naval stores exhibit. 

PAMLICO COUNTY— MRS. FRED LATHAM, ORIENTAL, REPRESENTA- 
TIVE. 

May 5, Bayboro. A band concert and commemorative serv- 
ice was conducted for the county. Sketches of county his- 
tory and its churches were presented by the representative. 

PENDER COUNTY— MRS. ROY ROWE, BURGAW, REPRESENTATIVE. 

April 1, Burgaw. Mr. David Stick, Commission member, 
author and historian, was the guest speaker at a program 
in the Burgaw High School Auditorium. Honor students 
from the schools served as pages. Judge Clifton L. Moore 
presented a short history of the county's first one-hundred 
years. Mr. Stick was introduced by Gen. John D. F. Phil- 
lips, Executive-Secretary of the Charter Commission. Mrs. 
E. L. Durham, Commission member, assisted in planning 
the program. Miss Martha Rowe presented a painting of 
the John Alexander Lillington home, built in 1734, to Dr. 
Christopher Crittenden, Director of the State Department 
of Archives and History. 



42 The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 

PITT COUNTY— MISS TABITHA M. DEVISCONTI, FARMVILLE, REPRE- 
SENTATIVE. 

April 26-28, Greenville. The spring regional meeting of the 
North Carolina Literary and Historical Association in- 
cluded an address by Stanley South of the Brunswick Town 
restoration on historic colonial sites. 

October 13, Washington, D. C. The East Carolina College 
Marching Pirates appeared at a professional football half- 
time show maneuvering to form symbols representing 
the Tercentenary celebration. The program was televised 
on a national network. 

RICHMOND COUNTY— I. S. LONDON, ROCKINGHAM, REPRESENTA- 
TIVE. 

May 25 & 26 v , Hamlet. The Junior and Senior Women's 
Clubs sponsored the annual Flower Show in commemora- 
tion of the Tercentenary with a program entitled, "Our 
Heritage." A Tercentenary educational exhibit was dis- 
played and arrangements and drawings were judged on 
adherence to colonial themes. 

ROBESON COUNTY— MRS. W. SCOTT SHEPHERD, LUMBERTON, REP- 
RESENTATIVE. 

February 20, Fayetteville. Mrs. Scott Shepherd spoke to the 
Cumberland County Committee of the Colonial Dames. 

March 1-3, St. Pauls. Tercentenary display and exhibit at 
Eastern Carolina Coin Show. 

March 23, Lumberton. A "Charter Oak" was planted at the 
Robeson County Court House. Judge Henry A. McKin- 
nan was the guest speaker for the ceremony. Winners of 
the local essay contest were announced. 

April 18, Lumberton. Mrs. Charles B. Fuller addressed the 
Robeson County Colonial Dames on the "Lords Proprie- 
tors." 

May 7, Lumberton. Mrs. Shepherd spoke to the Rotary 
Club. 

September 16, Lumberton. The Woman's Club heard Mrs. 
Shepherd discuss the Tercentenary celebration and Robe- 
son County participation. 



Local Commemorative Observances 43 

October, St. Pauls. Mrs. Browne Evans presented a program 

on "The Lords Proprietors" to the Wednesday Study 

Club. 
October 17, Lumberton. Mrs. Berry French spoke to the 

Robeson Committee Colonial Dames on "Wives of the 

Lords Proprietors." 
October 22, Maxton. Mrs. Shepherd addressed the Woman's 

Civic Club on "North Carolina History and Heritage." 

SAMPSON COUNTY— MRS. TAFT BASS,, CLINTON, REPRESENTATIVE. 

May, Clinton. The Tercentenary theme was included in the 
Garden Club meeting. 

WAYNE COUNTY— HENSON P. BARNES, GOLDSBORO, REPRESENTA- 
TIVE. 

February 22, Goldsboro. A Tercentenary "Kickoff Dinner" 
for Wayne County activities was held in the Hotel Golds- 
boro. Dr. Hugh Lefler, historian, was the guest speaker. 
Mr. Henry Belk, member of the Executive Committee of 
the Commission offered brief remarks. 

Mount Olive College Drama Department presented "The 
Prince of Parthia," first play completed in the colonies. 

District III— Dr. Henry W. Jordan, Cedar Falls, Chief. 

ALAMANCE COUNTY— GEORGE D. COLCLOUGH, BURLINGTON, REP- 
RESENTATIVE. 

March 15, Elon College. General John D. F. Phillips ad- 
dressed the student body of Elon College on the signifi- 
cance of the Charter. 

April 21, Burlington. The annual Hawfields Presbyterian 
Church Homecoming included a sermon by Dr. A. V. 
Gibson relating to the Tercentenary entitled, "Heritage 
and Challenge." 

May 17, Burlington. The Music Club presented a program, 
"Colonial and Contemporary Music." 

June 6, Gibsonville. The Book Club discussed aspects of the 
Tercentenary program. 

June 22, Snow Camp. The Cane Creek Meeting House, the 
oldest continuous Quaker Church in North Carolina, fea- 



44 The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 

tured guest speaker Holt McPherson, Editor of the High 
Point Enterprise. Historical items were displayed, includ- 
ing a scale model of the original landmark structures. 

ALEXANDER COUNTY. 

The Taylorsville Study Club chose the Tercentenary as 
the theme for the year's study. A handbook was prepared 
using the symbol and appropriate quotations for each 
program. Mrs. Bob Heafner and Mrs. Victor Prusa pre- 
sented a program on fine arts in September. 

ANSON COUNTY— MRS. W. J. GULLEDGE, WADESBORO, REPRESEN- 
TATIVE. 

January, Wadesboro. The entire month was spent in plan- 
ning a twelve-month observance and choosing committees. 

February, Anson County. Designated History Month in all 
schools. Beautification programs were held throughout the 
county. Five garden clubs in a joint ceremony planted dog- 
wood trees on Anson County Hospital grounds. 

March, Wadesboro. A concerted effort was made to obtain 
and restore the Dr. Hugh Hammond Bennett House. Dr. 
Bennett is known as "The Father of Conservation." 

April 19, Wadesboro. A Spring Festival featured music, 
drama, and art. "Stepping Stones," a pageant written by 
the representative, incorporated the history of the county 
and state from the past to the present. 

May, Anson County. All PTA groups emphasized the im- 
portance of the Tercentenary celebration. 

June & July, Anson County. Designated "Know Your State 
Months," with field trips and family tours emphasized. 

August 12, Lilesville. The Baptist Church Homecoming in- 
cluded a commemorative program. 

September 23-29, Anson County. Designated "Constitution 
Week" in all schools, with programs, displays and a cen- 
tral exhibit in Wadesboro of early North Carolina. 

October 12, Forestville. A "Fall Ingathering" was held at 
the Forestville Church with a Tercentenary exhibit. 

November, Anson County. Designated "Month of Grati- 
tude" in observance of Thanksgiving and the religious 
provisions of the Charter. 



Local Commemorative Observances 45 

December 14, Wadesboro. The First Methodist Church dedi- 
cated the Christmas Cantata to the Tercentenary. 

CABARRUS COUNTY. 

October, Concord. The Quest Book Club featured the Ter- 
centenary as the year's study. 

CASWELL COUNTY. 

June 21, Yanceyville. Miss Julia Ribet of the Charter Com- 
mission staff spoke to the local chapter of the Daughters 
of the American Revolution. 

CATAWBA COUNTY— DR. J. E. HODGES, MAIDEN, REPRESENTATIVE. 

February, Hickory. The St. Cecilia Music Club presented 
its annual parade of American Music in honor of the 
Tercentenary. Miss Thelma Rast of Lenoir Rhyne College 
led the program in a discussion of the history relevant to 
the Charter and the progression of music through 1773. 

March 11, Hickory. The Junior High School heard Miss 
Julia Ribett discuss the Tercentenary celebration. Dis- 
plays made by the students regarding the celebration were 
exhibited. 

April 21. Maiden. A re-enactment of Adam Sherrill's Cross- 
ing of the Catawba River was conducted at Rehobeth 
Church. A picnic followed the service. 

September, Hickory. Mrs. Josephine Shumate presented a 
program on Culpeper's Rebellion to the Liberal Arts 
Club which selected the Tercentenary as the study for 
the year. 

October 1, Hickory. Mrs. P. W. Deaton, President of the 
Hickory Woman's Club, directed members of the Junior 
Woman's Club on a tour of the Log Cabin as a part of 
the program on heritage in observance of the Carolina 
Charter Tercentenary. 

October 19, Hickory. The Liberal Arts Club heard Mrs. E. E. 
Smith in a program on the Lords Proprietors. 

CHATHAM COUNTY— EDWARD S. HOLMES, PITTSBORO, REPRESEN- 
TATIVE. 

May 23, Pittsboro. Miss Julia Ribet of the Charter Commis- 
sion spoke to the Chatham County Historical Society. 



46 The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 

CLEVELAND COUNTY. 

April, Shelby. Mrs. William Royster presented a program on 

the celebration to the Ishpenning Club. 
May 7, Kings Mountain. The Junior Chamber of Commerce 

annual Ladies Night featured Mr. James B. Garland in an 

address on the Tercentenary. 

DAVIDSON COUNTY— COL. WADE H. PHILLIPS, LEXINGTON, REPRE- 
SENTATIVE. 

October 1 & 2, Thomasville. A Home Tour was conducted 
by the Junior Woman's Club. 

October 14, Thomasville. Mrs. Clifton Black, history teacher 
in the City Schools, in an address to the Civitan Club dis- 
cussed the circumstances under which the Carolina Char- 
ter was issued. 

FORSYTH COUNTY— ARCHIBALD CRAIGE, WINSTON-SALEM, REPRE- 
SENTATIVE. 

March 24, Winston-Salem. Dr. Frank P. Graham, United 
Nations mediator and Chairman of the North Carolina 
Tercentenary Celebration Commission (federal) spoke to 
an assembly of Winston-Salem Teachers College students. 

April 24, Winston-Salem. A vesper service address was con- 
ducted by the students of Winston-Salem Teachers Col- 
lege. 

April 26-28, Winston-Salem. First North Carolina Confer- 
ence on Preservation paid tribute to the Tercentenary. 

April 27, Winston-Salem. Winston-Salem Teachers College 
chapel exercises included a program on the 300th an- 
niversary. 

October 26, Winston-Salem. The Wake Forest College 26th 
annual band day included participation by 22 bands in 
forming the figure "NC 300" and dedicating a new march, 
The North Carolina Tercentenary March, written by Cal- 
vin Huber, Director of the Wake Forest Band. 

GASTON COUNTY. 

June, Gastonia. The first volume of the new edition of the 
Colonial Records of North Carolina was presented to the 



Local Commemorative Observances 47 

Gaston Public Library by the Sharps and Flats Music 
Club. Mrs. George Wincroff III made the presentation. 
October 9, Gastonia. The U. C. Club chose the Tercentenary 
for the year's study. Miss Wilbur Sweeney presented a 
program on "North Carolina in Its Earliest Days." 

GUILFORD COUNTY— BLACKWELL P. ROBINSON, GREENSBORO, REP- 
RESENTATIVE. 

November (1962) , Greensboro. Dr. Hugh T. Lefler, Kenan 
Professor of History at Chapel Hill, was the guest speaker 
at a kickoff banquet for activities in the county. 

April, Greensboro. Mrs. Grant Joslin presented a program 
to the members of the Variety Study Club. 

May 21, Greensboro. Dr. Blackwell P. Robinson spoke to 
the members of the Exchangette Club. 

May 22, Greensboro. The O. Henry Woman's Club held a 
fashion show featuring the colonial costumes which had 
been made for the Federation Convention in Asheville. 

September, Greensboro. The annual Hairstyle Show pre- 
sented by the Cosmotologist Club observed the Tercen- 
tenary with symbolic hair styles of the State. 

IREDELL COUNTY— J. C. STEELE, JR., STATESVILLE, REPRESENTA- 
TIVE. 

April 24, Statesville. Mr. J. R. Huskins, editor of the States- 
ville Record & Landmark, delivered an address to the Chez 
Nous Book Club. 

April 29, Statesville. The Woman's Club and Junior Service 
League gave a performance of an original pageant, "Old 
North State," written by Mrs. J. S. Evans, to all school 
children (est. 2,600) in Statesville. That evening the 
pageant was performed for the public. The pageant script 
was reproduced for use by other organizations. 

April 30, Asheville. The same cast noted above presented the 
pageant to the annual meeting of the State Federation of 
Women's Clubs. 

November 1, Statesville. A program on the subject of the 
Charter was presented by Mr. J. C. Fowler to the Iredell 
County Chapter of the Colonial Dames of America. 



48 The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 

LINCOLN COUNTY— FRANK H. CROWELL, LINCOLNTON, REPRE- 
SENTATIVE. 

August, Lincolnton. Mrs. Hal Heafner wrote a Tercentenary 
pageant for the Woman's Democratic Club meeting. The 
play was performed in the park and later taped for local 
radio listeners. 

November, Lincolnton. The Anna Jackson Book Club heard 
Mrs. Floyd Corriher and Mrs. Herbert Kuhn speak on the 
topic of the anniversary. 

MECKLENBURG COUNTY— PHILLIP N. ALEXANDER, CHARLOTTE, 
REPRESENTATIVE. 

The Twentieth Century Book Club of Charlotte selected 
the Tercentenary as the topic for their year-long study. 

May 8, Charlotte. A commemorative luncheon was given by 
the Woman's Club under the supervision of Mrs. L. R. 
Knight. 

May 17, Charlotte. Dr. R. W. Reike addressed the Charlotte 
Chapter of the North Carolina Society, Sons of the Ameri- 
can Revolution, on the Tercentenary. The address was 
later carried by a local radio station. 

September 15, Charlotte. The Mint Museum of Art honored 
the Tercentenary at an exhibit. 

September 19, Charlotte. The Battle of Charlotte Chapter 
of the Daughters of the American Revolution heard Miss 
Ruth Blackwelder of Charlotte College on "Our Carolina 
Charter and Our U. S. Constitution." 

November 18-22, Charlotte. The Tercentenary was utilized 
as the official theme of the week-long real estate educa- 
tional program sponsored by the Charlotte Board of 
Realtors. 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 

October 4, Troy. The Music Club conducted a program in 
keeping with the 300th anniversary on "Music of the Early 
Colonists" given by Mrs. Floyd Arscott. 

ORANGE COUNTY— JAMES H. COMAN, HILLSBORO, REPRESENTA- 
TIVE. 

October 6, Hillsboro. Mr. Coman met with a planning com- 



Local Commemorative Observances 49 

mittee composed of: Miss Anne Cameron, Mrs. John Carr, 
Mr. C. Paul Carr, Rev. Ed Smith, and Miss Elaine Dor- 
sett. 

October 11, Hillsboro. Mr. John Kellenberger presented a 
program to the Historic Hillsborough Society on the his- 
tory of the Charter and early Carolina in connection with 
his discussion of the restoration of the Tryon Palace. 

December 6, Hillsboro. A musicale entitled, "An Evening 
of 17th & 18th Century Music" was presented by the 
Tercentenary Committee at the monthly meeting of the 
Hillsborough Historical Society. Professor Edgar Alden 
of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, di- 
rected. 

Through the instrumentality of Mrs. Robert M. Lester of 
Chapel Hill, a portrait of the Earl of Hillsborough was 
commissioned for the town. 

Posters depicting the Tercentenary symbol and the dates of 
the celebration were displayed in most store windows. 
Copies of the Charter Commission's "Text of the Carolina 
Charter" were presented to the Orange County Bar Asso- 
ciation for their information and study. 

PERSON COUNTY. 

October 8, Roxboro. A varied collection of antiques were 
displayed at a Heritage Tea sponsored by the Woman's 
Club. The members wore colonial costumes. 

ROCKINGHAM COUNTY— MRS. S. R. PRICE, REIDSVILLE, REPRESEN- 
TATIVE. 

September, 1962. Gen. John D. F. Phillips of the Charter 
Commission addressed the Leaksville Spray Rotary Club. 

October, 1962. A historical tour was conducted in prepara- 
tion for the Tercentenary. 

March, Rockingham County. The Historical Society offered 
prizes of $15.00 to the county winners in the Essay Con- 
test sponsored by the Charter Commission. 

March, Reidsville. The William Bethel Chapter of the 
Daughters of the American Revolution created a display 



50 The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 

and featured the Tercentenary in the program for the 

meeting. 
March, Reidsville. Mr. Henry W. Anderson addressed the 

Pilot Club on the subject of the Charter and the county's 

participation in the celebration. 
March, Reidsville. Miss Julia Ribet spoke to the Tuesday 

Afternoon Reading Club at High Rock Farm, home of 

the Representative. 
June, Reidsville. A framed copy of the Carolina Charter was 

presented to winners in the essay contest in the county. 
June 20, Leaksville. Miss Julia Ribet of the Charter Com- 
mission spoke to the Golden Age Club on the topic of the 

Tercentenary. 
June 21, Reidsville. Miss Ribet addressed the Colonial Dames 

of XVII Century. 
June, Reidsville. The Pilot Club presented 5 city schools 

with Mr. William Powell's book, The Carolina Charter of 

1663. 
July 15-20, Reidsville. Miss Julia Ribet and Mr. Henry 

Anderson appeared on a program in conjuction wtih the 

Trade Fair and the visit of the Mobile Museum. 
July 30, Leaksville. Miss Ribet spoke to the Leaksville-Spray 

Rotarians. 

STANLY COUNTY. 

September 10, Albemarle. The Home Life Department of 
Woman's Club met in colonial costume at the home of 
Mr. T. Burt Mauney. Mrs. J. F. Ervin and Mrs. Geddie 
Strickland presented a program on the Tercentenary. 

STOKES COUNTY— HON. GRACE T. RODENBOUGH, WALNUT COVE, 
REPRESENTATIVE. 

December 3, Danbury. An original pageant, "Sights and 
Sounds of the Birth of North Carolina," was presented by 
students of Danbury Elementary School. The narration 
for the pageant was written by the representative. Scenes 
were portrayed within a large wooden frame, and were 
entitled, "A Portrait of Charles," "Frontier Strife," "The 
Garret Musician," "Colonial Pastimes," "Carolina Evan- 



Local Commemorative Observances 51 

gelism," and "Albemarle Biographies," forming a living 
coloring book skit. A large bulletin board was prepared by 
the students also. 

SURRY COUNTY— W. FRANK CARTER, JR., MOUNT AIRY, REPRE- 
SENTATIVE. 

May 16, Mount Airy. Mr. Carter spoke to the Woman's 
Club regarding the celebration of the Charter. 

A series of historical articles was prepared for publication in 
the county newspapers and presented to the schools. The 
articles appearing in November and December were: 
"North Carolina Charters 1578-1629," "Charter to the 
Lords Proprietors of Carolina," "Carolina Through the 
Eyes of John Lederer, Explorer, 1670," and "Early Facts 
About About Surry County," by J. S. Atkinson, committee 
member. 

UNION COUNTY— MISS CLARA LANEY, MONROE, REPRESENTATIVE. 

November 9, Monroe. Miss Connie Home spoke on the 
Carolina Charters of 1663 and 1665 and the subsequent 
government of North Carolina at a meeting of the Caro- 
linas' Genealogical Society. 

District IV— Mrs. G. W. Cover, Andrews, Chief. 

AVERY COUNTY. 

July 13 & 14, Grandfather Mountain. The annual Highland 
Games honored the Tercentenary with an article in its 
souvenir program on the Charter and the Scots immigra- 
tion into Carolina. 

BUNCOMBE COUNTY— COL. PAUL A. ROCKWELL, ASHEVILLE, REP- 
RESENTATIVE. 

March 15, Asheville. A program in tribute to the Tercen- 
tenary was given at the Fannie Patton Chapter of the 
United Daughters of the Confederacy. 

April 30-May 2, Asheville. The annual convention of the 
North Carolina Federation of Women's Clubs included 
presentation of "Old North State," a pageant written by 
Mrs. J. S. Evans, Jr., and presented by the Statesville Club 



52 The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 

and the Junior Service League. Ladies wore colonial cos- 
tumes at the first evening meeting. 

BURKE COUNTY— W. HAROLD MITCHELL, VALDESE, REPRESENTA- 
TIVE. 

February, Valdese. The Norman Cordon Music Club dedi- 
cated its monthly program to music of the colonial period. 

February 27, Valdese. The Valdese Music Club celebrated 
the Tercentenary with its annual February Parade of 
Music. 

CALDWELL COUNTY— MRS. W. E. ALEXANDER, LENOIR, REPRE- 
SENTATIVE. 

April 18, Lenoir. Citizens donated plantings to beautify a 
section of the town and to commemorate the Carolina 
Charter of 1663. A joint dedication ceremony was con- 
ducted by town and club officials. 

May 10, Lenoir. Songs and information about the Tercen- 
tenary were presented by the Davenport Junior High 
School Girls Chorus in a radio program. 

The County Historical Society initiated plans to open a 
relics museum. 

CHEROKEE COUNTY— JOE RAY, MURPHY, REPRESENTATIVE. 

May 10, Murphy. A Declamation Contest was held in the 
Murphy High School. Thirteen boys participated. The 
three first-place winners were given free passes to the 
Murphy Swimming Pool for the 1963 season. All partici- 
pants were awarded a plate block of four Carolina Char- 
ter commemorative stamps and a letter of commendation. 

September 2-7, Murphy. The Nantahala Regional Library 
mounted a Tercentenary display at the Cherokee County 
Fair. 

A display was arranged in the Murphy Carnegie Library. 
The theme was "An Evening in Colonial North Carolina" 
and was maintained for four months. Many citizens volun- 
tarily loaned centuries-old artifacts. An essay contest was 
held in the Elementary School. 



Local Commemorative Observances 53 

GRAHAM COUNTY— JAMES STANLEY, ROBBINSVILLE, REPRESEN- 
TATIVE. 

December 3 (1962) , Robbinsville. A joint resolution recog- 
nizing the Tercentenary was adopted by the Board of 
County Commissioners and the Board of Education. 

HENDERSON COUNTY— MRS. P. F. PATTON, HENDERSONVILLE, 
REPRESENTATIVE. 

July 4, Hendersonville. The annual Fabulous Fourth Parade 
was followed by a formal program including a speech on 
the Carolina Charter. 

August 11, Flat Rock. A special adaptation of "The Red 
Shoes" was dedicated to the Tercentenary by the Flat 
Rock Playhouse. Originally set in Denmark, the play was 
transposed to the early North Carolina secene. 

MACON COUNTY— MRS. H. C. BUECK, FRANKLIN, REPRESENTATIVE. 

Educational and publicity material was distributed to schools 
and through the Chamber of Commerce tourists' booth. A 
feature article on the history of Macon County appeared 
in the local press and radio program of colonial music 
was presented. 

MCDOWELL COUNTY— MRS. ROBERT W. PROCTOR, MARION, REPRE- 
SENTATIVE. 

February, Marion. The second of two programs on the 
Carolina Charter was conducted by Mr. Hugh Beam for 
the Historical Society. 

MITCHELL COUNTY— J. P. DEYTON, SPRUCE PINE, REPRESENTA- 
TIVE. 

May 20, Bakersville. The eighth grade of Bowman Elemen- 
tary School presented a historical pageant, "A State is 
Born," to the school. 

June 22, Roan Mountain. Dr. Henry W. Jordan addressed 
participants in the annual Rhododendron Festival. 

July 31, Spruce Pine. Dr. Jasper L. Stuckey, State Geologist, 
presented the evening program for the Tercentenary at 
the annual Mineral and Gem Festival. 



54 The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 

RUTHERFORD COUNTY— GLENN JAMES, SPINDALE, REPRESENTA- 
TIVE. 

February, Spindale. Programs were presented at the TRI- 
community Woman's Club and the Daughters of the 
American Revolution. An exhibit displaying the Caro- 
lina Charter and antiques was prepared by the Avondale- 
Henrietta School for the auditorium of the school during 
the last week of the month. 

March, Spindale. Eighth-graders in the Spindale school 
compiled a report on the history of Spindale. It was pre- 
sented to local clubs and published in the Spindale Sun. 

June 1, Chase High School. Commencement speaker, Brenda 
Beatty, spoke on "Heritage" at the graduation exercises. 

June 1, Forest City. Mrs. Amos C. Duncan held open house 
with displays of historical documents after a tour of the 
eastern section of the county. 

June 3-8, Cliffside and Rutherfordton. Libraries of the towns 
exhibited antique items and held open house during the 
week in honor of the Tercentenary. 

TRANSYLVANIA COUNTY— MRS. RALPH H. RAMSEY, JR., BREVARD, 
REPRESENTATIVE. 

November 1 (1962), Brevard. The Brevard Music Club and 
the American Association of University Women sponsored 
a joint community program of folk music. 

March 1-25, Brevard. Chapel programs given at Brevard Col- 
lege and Brevard High School. A community program on 
March 25 was presented by Brevard College. Dr. Hugh T. 
Lefler, Kenan Professor of History at the University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, was the speaker. Mrs. 
Dave Harris gave a program to the Brevard Wednesday 
Book Club; Mrs. Ramsey addressed the same club in 
September, 1963, on Colonial Agriculture and Industry. 
The program of the Waight Still Avery Chapter of the 
Daughters of the American Revolution was devoted to the 
Carolina Charter. Miss Jean Childers presented radio 
talks on Colonial cooking and gardens. Similiar programs 
were presented by Mr. James E. David, County Farm 
Agent. 



Local Commemorative Observances 



55 




WAGON TREK FROM FERGUSON TO BOONE 

Some 200 persons participated in this three-day march commemorating 
the first crossing of the Blue Ridge Mountains by Daniel Boone. G. D. 
Barnett of Boone, wagon master, is seen at the head of the column. 



56 The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 

July 26-27, Brevard College. At the joint summer meeting 
of the North Carolina Literary and Historical Association 
and the Western North Carolina Historical Association, 
Mr. Robert C. Page, III gave a progress report on the work 
of the Charter Commission. 

WATAUGA COUNTY— DR. D. J. WHITENER, BOONE, REPRESENTA- 
TIVE. 

June 27-29, Boone and vicinity. A three-day wagon-train 
trek followed the original route of "Daniel Boone's 
Crossing of the Blue Ridge," in connection with the open- 
ing of the outdoor drama, "Horn in the West." The three- 
day celebration was co-ordinated by Herman J. Wilcox. 
Night camps by the wagon train were at Cook's Gap and 
Darby with an address by Dr. Christopher Crittenden, 
Director of the State Department of Archives and History, 
highlighting the second night's activities. A parade 
through Boone was followed by a Tercentenary com- 
memoration at the Appalachian State College Stadium 
with the principal address by Secretary of Commerce 
Luther Hodges. Dr. Frank P. Graham, Chairman of the 
North Carolina Tercentenary Celebration Commission 
(federal), addressed a special luncheon. Her Majesty, the 
Queen of England's Minister, Mr. Dennis A. Greenhill, 
spoke on the Charter in a prologue to the opening of the 
drama on Saturday evening. 

November 14, Boone. Dr. Martin Mailman, composer-in- 
residence at East Carolina College, conducted the Appa- 
lachian Concert Band and Chorus in a performance of 
his composition, "Leaves of Grass," dedicated to the Ter- 
centenary. 

WILKES COUNTY— MRS. EDD F. GARDNER, NORTH WILKESBORO, 
REPRESENTATIVE. 

January 21, Wilkesboro. Wilkes County Historical Society 

featured the Tercentenary. 
February 21, North Wilkesboro. Wilkes County Board of 

Commissioners passed a resolution urging observance of 

the anniversary. 



Local Commemorative Observances 57 

At the February meeting of the Ministerial Association of 
Wilkes County, the ministers were asked to include the 
Carolina Charter appropriately in services on March 24. In 
North Wilkesboro's First Methodist Church such a service 
was conducted which included a specially written anthem, 
"A Heritage Strong," written by choir director H. Grady 
Reagan. 

To encourage participation by students in the Charter Com- 
mission's Essay Contest, eight leaders of Wilkes County 
visited 26 schools to speak on North Carolina's colonial 
history. 

Five hundred copies of a condensed version of an address by 
Justice R. Hunt Parker of the Supreme Court of North 
Carolina on the Carolina Charter were distributed 
throughout the county. 

Speakers for the Tercentenary were secured for the following 
meetings: March 15-Civitan Club, Kiwanis Club, Lions 
Club; March 12-Wilkesboro Woman's Club; March 19- 
North Wilkesboro Woman's Club, North Wilkesboro 
Junior Woman's Club; March 26-Optimist Club, Wilkes- 
boro Business and Professional Men' Club. 

A display was maintained at the County Library. 

Radio programs were presented during March over Station 
WKBC and special recognition was given the Journal- 
Patriot for its coverage of the activities. 

YANCEY COUNTY— MRS. ERNEST BRIGGS, BURNSVILLE, REPRESEN- 
TATIVE. 

In order to develop an appropriate Tercentenary observance, 
the Yancey County Historical Association was organized, 
with the County Tercentenary Committee as a nucleus. 

Early in 1963, the County Commissioners passed a resolu- 
tion encouraging participation in the programs. 

May 9, Burnsville. The theme of Burnsville Woman's Club 
program was "Heritage." Mrs. Briggs, dressed in colon- 
ial costume, presented the program. 

July 11-13, Burnsville. The Parkway Players presented "The 
Prince of Pathia," the first play written and produced in 
the colonies. Four other productions were dedicated to 
the Tercentenary. 



58 The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 

August, 6-10, Burnsville. The Seventh Annual Folk Arts and 

Crafts Festival featured Club women and Girl Scouts in 

colonial costume. 
March 24 Yancey County's 100-year old church observed 

The 300th birthday with the pastor in the costume of the 

"circuit rider." 

District V— William C. Gretter, Jr., Louisburg, Chief. 

DURHAM COUNTY— WYATT T. DIXON, DURHAM, REPRESENTATIVE. 

March 26, 1962. Mr. Robert C. Page, III of the Charter Com- 
mission, spoke to the Tobaccoland Kiwanis Club. 

February 6, Durham, Gen. John D. F. Phillips, Executive- 
Secretary of the Charter Commission, addressed the Gen- 
eral Davie Chapter of the Daughters of the American 
Revolution. 

EDGECOMBE COUNTY— MRS. PEMBROKE NASH, TARBORO, REPRE- 
SENTATIVE. 

February, Tarboro. Tercentenary proclamation was passed 
by the County Commisisoners and published by The 

Southerner. 

March 24, Tarboro. Dr. Frank Coventry, Rector of the 
Church of St. Mary-le-Bone, London, England, was the 
guest preacher at service at the Calvary Episcopal Church. 
A "Charter Oak" was planted in the Town Common by 
the Edgecombe Garden Clubs. 

March 24-29, Tarboro. Collections of silver, china, clothing 
and artifacts were exhibited in display windows of three 
stores. Tercentenary placards were distributed. 

A memorial fund to be used for purchase of the new edition 
of Colonial Records was established. 

Special shelves were designated in libraries for Edgecombe 
and North Carolina history. 

To county students who participated in the Charter Com- 
mission's Essay Contest, four savings bonds, totalling $150, 
were awarded in the city and county's eighth and eleventh 
grades. Facsimiles of the Carolina Charter of 1663 were 
presented to County School Libraries. About 15,000 place- 



Local Commemorative Observances 59 

mats, depicting principal historical events from 1663-1763, 
were distributed in the county. 
Speeches on Tercentenary themes were made at the Rotary 
Club, the Colonial Dames of Wilson-Edgecombe, Kiwanis 
Club, the Colonial Dames of XVII Century (Rocky 
Mount) , Rocky Mount Woman's Club, Conetoe High 
School, and the Magazine Club. 

FRANKLIN COUNTY— MRS. RICHARD C. WHITFIELD, FRANKLINTON, 
REPRESENTATIVE. 

Mrs. Whitfield spoke to the Franklinton Lions Club and 
the Franklinton Woman's Club. Pamphlets published by 
the Charter Commission were placed on display in the 
eighth grade classrooms. 

GRANVILLE COUNTY— MRS. EDITH F. CANNADY, OXFORD, REPRE- 
SENTATIVE. 

February, Oxford. A Carolina Charter program was pre- 
sented at the Tuesday Study Club. 

November 6, Butner. Miss Julia Ribet sang folk songs for 
the Butner Club Fair. 

November 19, Oxford. In a formal program at the court- 
house, Mr. Dan Paul, Commission member, delivered the 
principal address. Messrs. Sam Ragan and Thad Stem, 
Jr., winners of the Charter Commission's Literary Compe- 
tition, read their winning poem, "In the Beginning." Folk 
songs, sacred music and dances of the colonial period were 
also presented at programs during the week. 

Granville County Library displayed pertinent North Caro- 
lina books. 

HALIFAX COUNTY— MRS. HORACE P. ROBINSON, LITTLETON, REP- 
RESENTATIVE. 

January 30-March 5, Halifax. Mrs. Robinson addressed stu- 
dents of the Aurelian Springs High School, the Garden 
Club, the PTA and the Lions Club. 

April 12, Halifax. The annual celebration of Halifax Day 
included the dedication of Dutch Colonial House, lunch- 
eon, parade, and an address by Dr. Henry W. Jordan from 
the courthouse steps on the Halifax Resolves and the 



60 The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 

Carolina Charter. Mr. Ray Wilkinson directed the com- 
bined celebration as President of the Historic Halifax 
Restoration Association. 

October 21, Weldon. Mrs. Wiley Ellis spoke to the local 
Book Club. 

October 28-31, Roanoke Rapids. Visit of the Mobile Mu- 
seum of History was sponsored by the Junior Woman's 
Club. 

JOHNSTON COUNTY— PETER T. HULTH, JR., SMITHFIELD, REPRE- 
SENTATIVE. 

December 3, Smithfield. Resolution passed by the County 
Commissioners urging observance of the Tercentenary. 

March 13, Clayton. Miss Julia Ribet, The Charter Commis- 
sion's Administrative Assistant, spoke to the Clayton 
Woman's Club. 

April 19, Smithfield. Miss Julia Ribet addressed the local 
Lions Club. 

NASH COUNTY— I. S. INSCOE, NASHVILLE, REPRESENTATIVE. 

May 3, Rocky Mount. The local chapter of the American 
Institute of Banking used the Tercentenary as the theme 
for its annual banquet. 

May 4, Rocky Mount. Professor William Carrington Gretter, 
Jr., of Louisburg College, addressed the annual meeting 
of the North Carolina Society of Colonial Dames. 

September 17, Rocky Mount. Hon. Francis E. Winslow, 
Chairman of the Charter Commission, spoke to the 20th 
Century Club. 

September, Rocky Mount. In the last week of the month, 
Mr. Ray Wilkinson addressed the Worth While Study 
Club on Historic Halifax Restoration and the Tercen- 
tenary. 

October 22, Rocky Mount. Miss Julia Ribet appeared be- 
fore the Caswell-Nash Chapter meeting of the Daughters 
of the American Revolution. 



Local Commemorative Observances 61 

VANCE COUNTY— ROBERT G. KITTRELL, JR.,, HENDERSON, REPRE- 
SENTATIVE. 

January 16, Henderson. Mr. J. C. Cooper addressed the 
West-End PTA. 

January 23, Henderson. Honorable Francis E. Winslow, 
Chairman of the Charter Commission, spoke to the local 
chapter of the Colonial Dames. 

February 2., Henderson. Gen. John D. F. Phillips, Execu- 
tive-Secretary of the Charter Commisison, addressed the 
E. M. Rollins PTA. 

March, Henderson. The Citizens Bank and Trust Company 
displayed colonial documents, silver, and watches. 

October 13, Williamsboro. A service was conducted by the 
Rt. Rev. Richard H. Baker employing the Book of Com- 
mon Prayer used in colonial North Carolina. 

October, Henderson. Fifth-graders of E. M. Rollins School 
visited the Tercentenary program being presented at the 
Morehead Planetarium, Chapel Hill. 

October 17, Henderson. Mr. J. C. Cooper spoke to the 
Sorosis Club. 

Local literary clubs provided prizes for county participants 
in the Charter Commission's Essay Contest. 

Recognition was given the Tercentenary at memorial serv- 
ices at the Kittrell Cemetery by the U.D.C. 

WAKE COUNTY— COL. GODFREY CHESHIRE, RALEIGH, REPRESEN- 
TATIVE. 

Various dates in 1962 and 1963, Raleigh. Robert C. Page, 
III of the Charter Commission staff addressed the Page 
Book Club, the Social Studies Club of Josephus Daniels 
Junior High School, Raleigh Public Relations Society, and 
the Zebulon Rotary Club. 

Various date in 1963, Raleigh. Miss Julia Ribet of the Char- 
ter Commission staff spoke to the Lions Club, Pilot Club 
the Garner PTA. 

April 4, Raleigh. The county committee sponsored recep- 
tion at the State Museum of Art during the opening of the 
Tercentenary Exhibition. 



62 The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 

September 25, Raleigh. Mr. Dan Paul spoke at a luncheon 
for the wives of the Agriculture Chiefs of the county. His 
topic was the Tercentenary and sketches of the Wives of 
the Proprietors. 

October 1, Cary. The Garden Club planted a commemora- 
tive tree with appropriate ceremonies. 

October 1, Raleigh. A pageant "Old North State," by mem- 
bers of the Raleigh Junior Woman's Club was presented 
at a meeting of the group. 

October 8, Raleigh. General John D. F. Phillips, Executive- 
Secretary of the Charter Commission, spoke to the Polk 
Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. 

St. Mary's Junior College, Raleigh, presented three events 
in honor of the Tercentenary. History, drama, music and 
sociology students participated. 

WARREN COUNTY— HON. W. LUNSFORD LONG, WARRENTON, REP- 
RESENTATIVE. 

Manly Wade Wellman wrote a historical novel, Settlement 
on Shocco, Adventures in Colonial Carolina, at the sugges- 
tion of Mr. Long. 

WILSON COUNTY— MRS. C. L. BLACKBURN, WILSON, REPRESENTA- 
TIVE. 

July 12, 1962, Wilson. A bibliography was compiled and 

submitted to the Charter Commission for publication and 

distribution. 
Local study clubs devoted the entire year to the Carolina 

Charter and period from 1663-1763. 
Packets of Charter Commission publications were distributed 

to teachers and librarians in the county. 
Three programs were presented to the local chapter of the 

Daughters of the American Revolution. 
Throughout 1963, Tercentenary displays were maintained 

in the county's libraries. 



CHAPTER VIII 

Financing the Tercentenary Programs 

As has been stated, the legislation establishing the Com- 
mission in 1959 authorized the use of the Contingency and 
Emergency Eund for the group's initial organization and 
planning activities. Accordingly, a grant of $9,330 was pro- 
vided the Commission for its needs in the fiscal year end- 
ing June 30, 1960. Only part of this amount was expended, 
however, due to the delay in recruiting a staff for the Com- 
mission and initiation of activity. At the outset of fiscal year 
1961, therefore, a request was submitted to the Council of 
State for a new gTant from the Contingency and Emergency 
Fund in the amount of $21,200. This request was approved 
and the development of outline plans for the major activi- 
ties of the Tercentenary was continued. 

The last six months of 1960 were devoted to this work and 
to the preparation of a budget to support planned projects. 
During this period it was decided to limit, insofar as pos- 
sible, requests to the General Assembly for funds for Ter- 
centenary activities to those required for projects having 
educational value. The Commission agreed that other sources 
would be sought for funds for projects in the fields of enter- 
tainment and recreation. A budget request for fiscal years 
1962 and 1963, therefore, totaling $194,990, was submitted to 
the 1961 General Assembly. Of the amount requested, ap- 
proximately $106,000 or 54 per cent was earmarked for the 
support of Tercentenary programs. The balance was re- 
quired to maintain an office and a staff of approximately 
ten persons, half of whom were assigned to the Colonial 
Records project. 

Table 1, on next page, reflects the appropriations of 
State funds to the Commission during fiscal year 1960 and 
the subsequent period ending December 31, 1963, as well 
as the expenditures of these funds. Table 2, which follows, 
indicates the breakdown of the expenditures among the 
major projects which required financing from State funds. 



64 



The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 





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Financing the Tercentenary Programs 65 

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES OF COMMISSION FUNDS 

Project FY 1960 FY 1961 FY 1962 FY 1963 FY 1964 FY 60-64 

Salaries $1,187 $10,392 $29,551 $39,828 $26,127 $107,085 

Travel Expenses 775 2,519 3,698 3,437 1,733 12,162 

Supplies, Equipt. Maint. 3,340 2,222 4,042 1,527 366 11,497 

Postage, Tel., Transport. 100 1,284 1,126 2,400 1,192 6,102 

Printing 64 1,923 2,350 7,791 1,383 13,511 



Total Administrative Costs 5,466 


18,340 


40,767 


54,983 


30,801 


150,357 


Program Costs: 












Schools, Coll. & Univ. 


2,000 




34,589 


16,058 


52,647 


Colonial Records 






26,119 


1,756 


27,875 


Awards 








1,500 


1,500 


Art Exhibit 






15,000 




15,000 


Souvenirs 






2,856 


2,177 


5,033 


Miscellaneous 


48 


702 


3,244 


810 


6,804 


Total Program Costs 


2,048 


702 


81,808 


22,301 


106,859 


Grand Totals $5,466 


$20,388 


$41,469 $136,791 


$53,102 $257,216 



TABLE 2 

These activities are included in the list .which follows, 
of the more important projects considered by the Commis- 
sion during the early planning phase of its work. The list 
shows the amount of funds, if any, required for each item 
and an indication of the source of these funds. 

The decision to seek funds from private as well as public 
sources in order to finance Tercentenary activities, neces- 
sitated the appointment of a committee on ways and means. 
Such a group was organized under the co-chairmanship of 
Mr. James G. W. MacLamroc and Dr. Henry W. Jordan, and 
was assigned the task of raising funds from private individ- 
ual and corporate donors for Tercentenary purposes, in- 
cluding contributing to the cost of construction of the de- 
sired building for the State Department of Archives and 



66 



Thf. Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 



History, should funds for it not be available from appro- 
priations by the General Assembly. For this reason the fund- 
raising body was designated as the Committee on Finance 
and Building;. 



PROJECTS PLANNED BY COMMISSION FOR TERCENTENARY 
Project Estimated Cost How Financed 



Arts 

Literary Competition with awards 

in fiction, non-fiction and poetry $ 3,000 
Musical Compositions 10,000 

Commemorative Events 

Celebrations at different times during 

1963 in historic communities 

throughout the state including 

exhibits, memorial exercises 

pageants, parades, etc. Unknown 

Convention of General Assembly in 

Pasquotank County Unknown 



State Funds 

Private Contributions 



Local Sources 



General Assembly 



Programs in Schools, Colleges and Universities 



Campus activities including con- 
vocations, dramatic sketches, 
exhibits, founders' day 
exercises, musical programs, 
pageants, etc. 

Essay Contest 

History Pamphlets 

Mobile Museum 

Motion Picture 



Unknown 


Local Sources 


1,000 


State Funds 


25,000 


State Funds 


50,000 


Private Contributions 


30,000 


State Funds 



Scholarly Activities 

Initiation of republication of 

Colonial Records of North 

Carolina, including search for 

additional materials 30,000 

Learned Society Meetings 1,000 



Miscellaneous 



Commemorative Postage Stamp 
Medallions, Maps, Programs, 
Souvenirs, etc. 



State Funds 

Private Contributions 



nil 



5,000 State Funds 



Financing the Tercentenary Programs 67 



Summary 



Estimated cost of projects to be financed by 

public funds SI 06,000 

Estimated cost of projects to be financed from 

private contributions 61,000 

SI 67,000 



Carolina Charter Corporation 

In order to provide an agency to receive, account for, and 
disburse funds generated by the Commission's Committee 
on Finance and Building, it was decided to organize a non- 
profit corporation under the laws of North Carolina. Such a 
corporation, known as the Carolina Charter Corporation, 
was established with the mission of soliciting funds from 
appropriate nongovernment sources for the support of the 
Commission's work, acquiring and disposing of property in 
its behalf, and generally serving as its business agent. Mem- 
bership in the Corporation was limited to those persons 
serving as members of the Commission. The members of 
the Commission's Executive Committee were elected direc- 
tors of the Corporation. The Executive Secretary of the 
Commission was appointed Secretary-Treasurer of the Cor- 
poration. Rulings were requested and obtained from federal 
and State revenue agencies exempting the Corporation from 
the payment of income taxes and permitting the deduction 
for tax purposes by donors of contributions made to it. 

Fund-raising efforts were begun in January, 1961, and by 
the conclusion of the Tercentenary sums totaling $32,475 
had been received or pledged, in addition to the presentation 
of the Mobile Museum of History, which, with its tractor, 
represented a donation of $42,500. These contributions 
were supplemented by additional cash payments solicited 
for the support of Tercentenary programs by the North 
Carolina Tercentenary Celebration Commission (federal 
commission). The latter contributions to December 31, 1963, 
totaled $4,928.27. 

The aggregate of the foregoing contributions was aug- 
mented by other receipts, including those from the sale of 



68 The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 

souvenir items and publications. Funds from these sources 
totaled more than $6,000 by the end of the Tercentenary, 
thus bringing the total receipts of the Corporation in kind, 
cash and pledges to an amount in excess of $85,000. Details of 
the financial position of the corporation are shown in an 
annex to this report. 

The resources of the Corporation were sufficient to per- 
mit financing all the approved projects of the Commission, 
including an allocation of $20,000 in cash and pledges for the 
support of the Colonial Records Project. However, this en- 
dowment is only a fraction of the amount required for that 
work, as was indicated in an earlier section of this report. 
Consequently, it was decided to continue the Corporation in 
existence after the termination of the Tercentenary in order 
to permit the generation of additional funds for the Colonial 
Records Project. 



CHAPTER IX 

Miscellaneous 

Symbol for the Carolina Charter Tercentenary 

In order to enhance public awareness of the Tercentenary, 
a Stymbol was designed for wide dissemination. In the design 
careful attention was given to simplicity, meaningfulness, 
and directness for maximum impact, ready recognition, and 
retention potential. 

Based on the original seal of the eight Lords Proprietors 
of Carolina, this symbol had eight modified shields radiat- 
ing from a central core. Although similar to the original Pro- 
prietors' seal, the symbol was distinctly different, giving it 
an individuality and appeal of its own. 

Within the star-shaped core were the dates 1663-1963 
which gave a time reference to the Tercentenary celebration. 
At the center of the symbol was an abstraction of the front 
view of the new State Legislative Building, completion and 
initial occupation of which in 1963 coincided with the year 
of the celebration. The abstraction contrasted the new 
against the old represented by the eight shields. 

Single color design permitted simple, fast reproduction 
of the symbol by any conventional process. It was easily en- 
larged or reduced for use on letterheads and envelopes, 
newspapers and other publications. 

"Tercentenary News" 

By late 1961 correspondence and other contacts with 
local civic and professional leaders desirous of participating 
in some capacity in the forthcoming Tercentenary became 
so voluminous that a periodic newsletter was required to 
deal with inquiries. A circular letter was addressed to 
several hundred correspondents throughout the State invit- 
ing suggestions for the content and title for a monthly news 
publication. Respondents also were afforded an opportunity 
to designate one or two additional persons who might be 
interested in receiving the newsletter. 



70 The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 




(Obverse) 



(Reverse) 




CAROLINA CHARTER 
TERCENTENARY 

ABOVE— SEAL OF THE LORDS PROPRIETORS OF CAROLINA 
BELOW— SYMBOL OF THE CAROLINA CHARTER TERCENTENARY 



Miscellaneous 71 

In December, 1961, Volume I, Number 1, of Tercenten- 
ary News was issued with a circulation of 1,000 copies. The 
final edition, Volume III, Number 1, dated December, 
1963, had a circulation three times as large. The publication, 
which was suitably illustrated, contained announcements of 
the progress of planning and, later, of the actual events of 
the Tercentenary. An exchange of ideas and suggested pro- 
ects for consideration by local groups across the State were 
thus provided. 

Tercentenary News was mailed each month to several 
hundred out-of-state addressees, thus contributing to the 
spread of information about the Tercentenary to other parts 
of the country. The members of Congress from North Caro- 
lina were furnished monthly supplies of the publication for 
distribution to visitors to their offices. 

Other Public Information Activities 

In January, 1962, a program of preparation and distribu- 
tion of public information materials was begun under the 
immediate direction of Robert C. Page III, Public Informa- 
tion Officer for the Commission. A Committee on Public 
Information Activities was organized under the chairman- 
ship of Mr. Henry Belk of Goldsboro, distinguished editor 
and member of the Commission. The group included other 
representatives of the press as well as leaders in the radio 
and television fields. Their individual and collective counsel 
was invaluable in developing the Commission's publicity 
program. 

The tempo of the program was regulated so as to avoid 
saturating the public consciousness too far in advance of the 
actual Tercentenary without, however, neglecting announce- 
ments calculated to stimulate public interest and recogn- 
tion of the local planners. 

The issue of news releases to the daily and weekly press, 
and to radio and television outlets was gradually stepped up. 
During the two-year period over 142 such releases were 
issued. Numerous feature articles were prepared for news- 
papers, as well as for the trade and professional journals 
published in and out of the State. Spot announcements were 



72 The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 

Thinking big isn't new 
for North Carolina!^ 




King Charles II showed a lot of enthusiasm in 1663 when he 
drew a charter for the "Colony of Carolina." He cut a gigantic 
swath from the Atlantic to the Pacific — taking in all or parts 
of 17 present states. 

Today North Carolina is geographically smaller, but still 
retains a cross section of the seacoasts and plains and moun- 
tain playgrounds it always possessed. Also the State's products 
and opportunities have expanded in every direction . . . 
becoming No. 1 in textiles and tobacco and furniture and 
numerous other goods . . . producing a full gamut from Aircraft 
to Zippers, and recognized as the research center of the 
Southeast. 

Just as the "Colony of Carolina" began big, 300 years ago, 
North Carolina continues big. For a fascinating new book 
with over 100 illustrations showing the State's major historical 
attractions you can visit during the Tercentenary year in 
1963, mail coupon today. 

ea norih cmoum 

VARIETY VACATIONLAND 



ADVERTISEMENT BY STATE DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT 

Published in numerous nationally circulated newspapers and maga- 
zines 



Miscellaneous 73 

prepared for radio and television stations, the latter being 
supplied with slides embodying the Tercentenary symbol 
for display during the announcement. 

Virtually all publicity accorded the Tercentenary was 
favorable; at times it was especially complimentary as, for 
example, during the period of the original issue of the Com- 
memorative Stamp. Television coverage of local commem- 
orative observances was consistent and accurate. Especially 
thorough was the treatment of certain major events of the 
Tercentenary. These included the first-day-of-issue cere- 
monies for the Commemorative Stamp at Edenton, the Fore- 
fathers' Service at St. Thomas' Church in Bath, and the 
three-day observance of the Tercentenary in Boone. 

Tourist Activities 

Legislation establishing the Commission in 1959 recog- 
nized the potential of the Tercentenary as a stimulus to 
tourism, one of the State's leading industries. Accordingly, 
a Committee on Tourist Activities with Mr. Dan M. Paul 
of Raleioh member of the Commission, was organized. 
Measures such as incorporating Tercentenary information 
in automobile road maps, tourist advertising copy developed 
by the State's Travel Information Division, and locally pre- 
pared materials were used. These latter included decorative 
placemats in public eating places, signs erected in conspic- 
uous locations, souvenir items, store window displays, and 
the like. 

Special mention should be made of the attractive highway 
markers erected on roads throughout the State and especially 
on roads leading from neighboring states. These signs, 
designed and installed through the co-operation of Mr. Mer- 
rill Evans, Chairman of the State Highway Commission, and 
Mr. W. F. Babcock, Director of the Highway Department, 
incorporated the Tercentenary symbol and reminded motor- 
ists of the State's three hundredth anniversary. 

North Carolina Tercentenary Celebration Commission 

During the second session of the Eighty-Seventh Congress, 
legislation was introduced by members of North Carolina's 



74 The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 

Congressional delegation authorizing the establishment of 
a federal commission to participate in the observance of the 
State's Tercentenary. Having passed both houses, the bill 
was signed into law by the late President John F. Kennedy, 
April 27, 1962. The act provided for the appointment of 
15 members to a body designated as the North Carolina Ter- 
centenary Celebration Commission. Seven of the members, 
including the Chairman of the Federal Commission, were 
appointed by the President, four Senators were designated 
by the Vice-President, and four Representatives were selected 
by the Speaker of the House. The Honorable Frank P. 
Graham, distinguished North Carolinian and currently serv- 
ing as United Nations mediator for Kashmir, was appointed 
as Chairman. 

An organizational meeting of the Federal Commission was 
held in Washington, D. C, January 25, 1963, attended by 
Chairman Winslow of the State Commission, General Phil- 
lips and Miss Ribet. The members of the Federal Commis- 
sion were briefed by the representatives of the State Commis- 
sion in the nature and objectives of the latter's programs. 

As a result of the meeting the assistance of the members 
of the Federal Commission was obtained in a number of the 
State Commission's projects. Chief among these was securing 
the help of the Department of State in borrowing certain 
paintings from Great Britain for the Tercentenary Art Ex- 
hibit, and reinforcing the efforts of the State Commission 
in obtaining the Post Office Department's approval of the 
issue of the Commemorative Stamp. 

Another action taken by the chairman of the Federal Com- 
mission was the appointment of Senator B. Everett Jordan 
and Mr. Dwight Phillips of Charlotte as co-chairmen of a 
finance committee. As stated elsewhere in this report, this 
group had succeeded in raising contributions totaling 
$4,928.27 prior to the end of the Tercentenary. 

The Congressional members of the Federal Commission 
undertook to obtain additional Congressional recognition 
of the Tercentenary. Thus on March 25, 1963, Congressman 
Basil L. Whitener, Tenth North Carolina District, ob- 
tained an order of the day in the lower house for one hour 



Miscellaneous 75 

during which other members of the North Carolina Con- 
gressional delegation, the Speaker, and the Minority Leader 
spoke to the subject. On April 9, 1963, Senator Sam J. 
Ervin, Jr., addressed the Senate on the Tercentenary theme, 
and on April 22 Senator Ervin extended his remarks to insert 
the text of the Carolina Charter of 1663 in the Congressional 
Record. Materials for the foregoing purposes were prepared 
by the staff of the State Commission. 

The Carolina Charter Commemorative Stamp 

In June, 1961, at the recommendation of the Commission, 
Governor Terry Sanford addressed a request to Postmaster 
General J. Edward Day for the issue during 1963 of a post- 
age stamp in recognition of the Tercentenary. Despite the 
increased competition among requesting agencies through- 
out the country for commemorative postage stamps, oc- 
casioned by a decision by the Post Office Department to 
limit commemorative issues to 15 per annum beginning in 
1963, the North Carolina request was approved in Decem- 
ber, 1962. 

The Commission was asked by the Postmaster General's 
office to designate a place of first-day issue for the stamp. 
Careful consideration was given by the Commission to the 
qualifications of several of the oldest communities of the 
State as a result of which Edenton was recommended to the 
Post Office Department for the honor. The Commission's 
decision was based upon the fact that at the time of the 
extension of official Colonial postal service to North Caro- 
lina in April, 1738, by His Majesty's Postmaster General's 
deputy for the American Colonies, Edenton was the Colony's 
seat of government and was designated by the British deputy 
postmaster general as the southern terminus of the postal 
route. 

The Commemorative Stamp was a five-cent horizontal 
which reproduced the first page of the Carolina Charter of 
1663 in light brown, simulating parchment, against a back- 
ground of red velvet. Inset was "Carolina Charter 1663- 
1963" in dark brown lettering of the type used in the orig- 
inal document. At the right foreground was shown a quill 



76 



The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 




COMMEMORATIVE POSTAGE STAMP 

Reproduction of the stamp issued April 6 at Edenton in honor of the 
Tercentenary. Total number of these stamps sold by the Edenton post 
office on the first day of issue was 667,033. (Photo by Madlin Futrell) 



Miscellaneous 77 

pen; at the bottom right of the illustration "U. S. Postage" 
in lower case type was shown. The denomination appeared 
at bottom left. The stamp's dimensions were .84 x 1.44 
inches. Issued in panes of fifty, the initial printing was 
120,000,000. 

The first-day-of-issue ceremonies took place in the audi- 
torium of the Edenton Elementary School on April 6, 1963, 
with the Honorable John A. Mitchener, Jr., Mayor of the 
Town of Edenton, presiding. The distinguished guests 
seated on the platform at the exercises included Postmaster 
General J. Edward Day, Senator B. Everett Jordan, Con- 
gressmen Herbert C. Bonner and Charles R. Jonas, the Hon- 
orable John Gilliam Wood, representing Governor Sanford, 
Commission Chairman Francis E. Winslow and Mrs. Ernest 
L. Ives, a member of the Commission. 

Approximately one thousand persons attended the audi- 
torium ceremonies which were s^iven wide television cover- 
age. 



CHAPTER X 

Acknowledgments 

Special mention should be made of opportunities to pre- 
sent the Tercentenary to large groups of people assembled 
at fairs. Two of these, in particular, offered excellent oc- 
casions for this purpose: the North Carolina Trade Fair 
conducted in Charlotte April 29-May 4, and the State Fair 
held in Raleigh during the week of October 14. Through 
the co-operation of Mr. Ted Davis of the State Department 
of Conservation and Development, a booth was provided for 
a Tercentenary display at the Charlotte exhibit. In the 
case of the State Fair, similar facilities were put at the 
Commission's disposal through the courtesy of the Honor- 
able L. Y. Ballentine, Commissioner of the State Department 
of Agriculture. The Tercentenary displays at both these 
activities attracted tens of thousands of visitors who were 
given the free literature of the Commission. Many purchased 
Tercentenary publications and souvenir items. 

The support of the two State agencies cited above was 
paralleled by that of other official, semiofficial, and private 
civic and historical groups. Mention was made earlier in this 
report of the contributions of the State Highway Depart- 
ment. The Commission is also grateful to the State Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction and to Dr. Charles F. Carroll, 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction, ex officio mem- 
ber of the Commission, for the co-operation and support pro- 
vided, especially in the distribution of publications and con- 
duct of the Essay Contest. 

To the State Department of Archives and History and 
its Director, Dr. Christopher Crittenden, an ex officio mem- 
ber of the Commission, must go the major appreciation of 
the Commission. This was the State agency which drafted 
the authorizing legislation for the Commission, secured its 
early financial support, and furnished indispensable adminis- 
trative assistance throughout the Commission's life. 

The role of the State Department of Archives and History, 



Acknowledgements 79 

and of its semiofficial affiliate, the North Carolina Literary 
and Historical Association, in sponsoring and co-ordinating 
the activities of Culture Week is well known to North 
Carolinians. This relationship stimulated the interest in the 
Tercentenary and co-operation of the Culture Week groups 
during their 1962 and 1963 meetings. Many tributes were 
paid at this time to the Commission for its work by the 
aforementioned Literary and Historical Association which, 
it should be noted, as early as 1958 petitioned the State De- 
partment of Archives and History to sponsor the enabling 
legislation for the Tercentenary. Similar recognition was 
accorded the Tercentenary by the North Carolina Folklore 
Society, Dr. Arthur Palmer Hudson, Secretary; the North 
Carolina Society for the Preservation of Antiquities, Mrs. 
J. O. Tally, Jr., President; the North Carolina State Art 
Society, Dr. Joseph C. Sloane, President; and the North 
Carolina Association of County and Local Historians, Dr. 
Blackwell P. Robinson, President. 

The support accorded the Commission by patriotic and 
civic groups was too extensive to detail in this summary re- 
port. Nevertheless, a few of the women's patriotic organi- 
zations may be cited as representative of the many which 
furthered the Tercentenary programs: the North Carolina 
branches of Colonial Dames of America, Colonial Dames of 
the XVII Century, Daughters of the American Revolution, 
Daughters of the Revolution, and United Daughters of 
the Confederacy. 

Finally, also in the distaff department, the very special 
thanks of the Commission is extended to the North Caro- 
lina Federation of Women's Clubs. This organization, under 
the intelligent, constructive and efficient leadership of its 
President, Mrs. James M. Harper, Jr., and its officers and 
chairmen, contributed significantly to the support of the 
Tercentenary throughout the State. 



80 



The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 



APPENDIX I 

COMMITTEES OF THE CAROLINA CHARTER 
TERCENTENARY COMMISSION 



COMMITTEE ON THE ARTS 

Mrs. J. O. Tally, Jr. 
Fayetteville Chairman 



Mrs. L. Y. Ballentine 

Raleigh 
Dr. Earl E. Beach 

Greenville 
Mrs. Doris Betts 

Sanford 
Dr. Justus Bier 

Raleigh 
Dr. John T. Caldwell 

Raleigh 
Prof. J. D. Clark 

Raleigh 
Mrs. Harold G. Deal 

Hickory 
William C. Fields 

Fayetteville 
Foster Fitz-Simons 

Chapel Hill 
Mrs. A. M. Fountain 

Raleigh 
Mrs. Bettie Sue Gardner 

Reidsville 
Mrs. Bernice Kelly Harris 

Seaboard 
Claude F. Howell 

Wilmington 
Dr. Arthur Palmer Hudson 

Chapel Hill 



William L. Hunt 

Chapel Hill 
Mrs. Ernest L. Ives 

Southern Pines 
John R. Lehman 

Raleigh 
Bascom Lamar Lunsford 

Leicester 
Henry Jay MacMillan 

Wilmington 
Mrs. Floyd Mehan 

High Point 
Ovid Pierce 

Greenville 
Mrs. Richardson Preyer 

Greensboro 
Dr. Lee Rigsby 

Greensboro 
Dr. Joseph Sloane 

Chapel Hill 
Charles Stanford 

Raleigh 
Dr. Benjamin Swalin 

Chapel Hill 
Howard White 

Burlington 
Ben F. Williams 

Raleigh 



Appendix I 



81 



COMMITTEE ON COMMEMORATIVE EVENTS 

Mrs. Harry McMulIan 

Washington Chairman 

Hon. J. V. Whitfield 

Wallace Vice-Chairman 



R. V. Asbury, Jr. 

Wilmington 
Henry Belk 

Goldsboro 
Hon. W. H. S. Burgwyn 

Woodland 
Miss Gertrude S. Carraway 

New Bern 
Mrs. Everett L. Durham 

Burgaw 
Capt. Nathaniel S. Fulford 

Hertford 
Edmund Harding 

Washington 
Grayson Harding 

Edenton 
Mr. & Mrs. James M. Harper, Jr. 

South port 
Hon. John R. Jordan 

Raleigh 



Mrs. Kauno Lehto 

Wilmington 
Mrs. E. R. MacKethan 

Fayetteville 
Dr. Herbert R. Paschal, Jr. 

Greenville 
Dan M. Paul 

Raleigh 
Mrs. Ralph Reeves, Jr. 

Raleigh 
Mrs. Charles Lee Smith 

Raleigh 
Stanley South 

Wilmington 
J. P. Str other 

Kinston 
Richard Walser 

Raleigh 
Walter Wootten 

Burlington 



COUNTY REPRESENTATIVES 

(Listed alphabetically by county in Districts) 

DISTRICT I 



L. S. Blades, Jr. 
Elizabeth City Chief 



Bertie 

James E. Tyler 

Roxobel 
Camden 

Jesse F. Pugh 

Old Trap 
Chowan 

David Warren 

Edenton 
Currituck 

Wilton Walker, Jr. 

Currituck 
Dare 

Aycock Brown 

Manteo 
Gates 

A. Pilston Godwin 

Gatesville 



Hertford 

I. P. Davis 

Winton 
Martin 

Elbert S. Peel 

Williamston 
Pasquotank 

Potter Dixon 

Elizabeth City 
Perquimans 

Mrs. Emmett Winslow 

Hertford 
Tyrrell 

Mrs. C. Earl Cohoon 

Columbia 
Washington 

Mrs. Sidney Ward, Sr. 

Plymouth 



82 



The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 



County Representatives (contd.) 



DISTRICT II 

Hon. J. V. Whitfield 
Wallace Chief 



Beaufort 

Mrs. Henry R. Swartzell 

Washington 
Bladen 

Mrs. E. F. McCulloch 

Elizabethtown 
Brunswick 

Mrs. M. Henderson Rourk 

Shallotte 
Carteret 

F. C. Salisbury 

Morehead City 
Columbus 

Mrs. Leslie Thompson 

Whiteville 
Craven 

W. L. Flowers 

New Bern 
Duplin 

Faison W. McGowen 

Kenansville 
Greene 

Mrs. George W. Edwards 

Snow Hill 
Harnett 

Miss Lois Byrd 

Sanford 
Hoke 

Mrs. T. B. Upchurch 

Raeford 
Hyde 

Mr. O. L. Williams 

Swan Quarter 
Jones 

Mrs. John Hargett 

Trenton 



Lee 

Miss Lois Byrd 

Sanford 
Lenoir 

Mrs. J. A. Jones 

Kinston 
Moore 

George R. Ross 

Jackson Springs 
New Hanover 

William G. Broadfoot, Jr. 

Wilmington 
Onslow 

Rev. Tucker Littleton 

Swansboro 
Pender 

Mrs. Roy Rowe 

Burgaw 
Pitt 

Miss Tabidia M. DeVisconti 

Farmville 
Richmond 

I. S. London 

Rockingham 
Robeson 

Mrs. W. Scott Shepherd 

Lumberton 
Sampson 

Mrs. Taft Bass 

Clinton 
Scotland 

Sam T. Snowdon, Jr. 

Laurinburg 
Wayne 

Henson P. Barnes 

Goldsboro 



Appendix I 



83 



County Representatives (contd.) 



DISTRICT III 

Dr. Henry W. Jordan 
Cedar Falls Chief 



Alamance 

George D. Colclough 

Burlington 
Anson 

Mrs. W. J. Gulledge 

Wadesboro 
Lincoln 

Frank Hull Crowell 

Lincolnton 
Mecklenburg 

Phillip N. Alexander 

Charlotte 
Catawba 

Dr. J. E. Hodges 

Maiden 
City of Charlotte 

James A. Stenhouse 

Charlotte 
Davidson 

Col. Wade H. Phillips 

Lexington 
Davie 

Gordon Tomlinson 

Mocksville 
Forsyth 

Archibald Craige 

Winston-Salem 



Guilford 

Carl F. Cannon, Jr. 
Greensboro 

Iredell 

J. C. Steele, Jr. 

Statesville 
Montgomery 

Lenue T. James 

Troy 
Randolph 

Dr. Henry W. Jordan 

Cedar Falls 
Rockingham 

Mrs. S. R. Prince 

Reidsville 
Rowan 

James S. Brawley 

Salisbury 
Stokes 

Hon. Grace Taylor Rodenbough 

Walnut Cove 
Surry 

W. Frank Carter, Jr. 

Mount Airy 
Union 

Miss Clara Laney 

Monroe 



84 



The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 



County Representatives (Contd.) 



DISTRICT IV 

Mrs. G. W. Cover 
Andrews Chief 



Ashe 

Thomas S. Johnston 

Jefferson 
Buncombe 

Col. Paul Rockwell 

Asheville 
Burke 

W. Harold Mitchell 

Valdese 
Caldwell 

Mrs. W. E. Alexander 

Lenoir 
Cherokee 

Joe Rae 

Murphy 
Clay 

William C. Carter 

Hayesville 
Graham 

James Stanley 

Robbinsville 
Haywood 

W. L. Barkby 

Canton 
Henderson 

Mrs. P. F. Patton 

Hendersonville 
Jackson 

Dr. W. E. Bird 

Cullowhee 



Macon 

Mrs. H. C. Bueck 

Franklin 
McDowell 

Mrs. Robert Proctor 

Marion 
Mitchell 

J. P. Deyton 

Spruce Pine 
Rutherford 

Glenn James 

Spindale 
Swain 

Dr. Kelly E. Bennett 

Bryson City 
Transylvania 

Mrs. Ralph H. Ramsey, Jr. 

Brevard 
Watauga 

Dr. D. J. Whitener 

Boone 
Wilkes 

Mrs. Edd F. Gardner 

North Wilkesboro 
Yancey 

Mrs. Ernest Briggs 

Burnsville 



Appendix I 



85 



County Representatives (Contd.) 



DISTRICT V 



William Carrington Gretter, Jr. 
Louisburg Chief 



Edgecombe 

Mrs. Pembroke Nash 

Tarboro 
Franklin 

Mrs. Richard Whitfield 

Franklinton 
Granville 

Mrs. Edith F. Cannady 

Oxford 
Halifax 

Mrs. Horace P. Robinson 

Littleton 
Johnston 

Peter T. Hulth, Jr. 

Smithfield 



Nash 

I. S. Inscore 

Nashville 
Northampton 

Mrs. Nancy Froelich 

Jackson 
Vance 

Robert G. Kittrell, Jr. 

Henderson 
Warren 

Hon. W. Lunsford Long 

Warrenton 
Wilson 

Mrs. C. L. Blackburn 

Wilson 



COMMITTEE ON FINANCE AND BUILDING 

James G. W. MacLamroc 
Greensboro Co-chairman 

Dr. Henry W. Jordan 
Cedar Falls Co-chairman 



Hon. Irwin Belk 

Charlotte 
L. S. Blades, Jr. 

Elizabeth City 
Mrs. E. M. Cameron 

Durham 
George V. Cecil 

Biltmore 
Archibald Craige 

Winston-Salem 
Sen. Claude Currie 

Durham 
Geo. P. Geoghegan, Jr. 

Raleigh 
Mrs. Quentin Gregory 

Halifax 



John Harden 

Greensboro 
Hon. S. Glenn Hawfield 

Monroe 
J. L. Home 

Rocky Mount 
McDaniel Lewis 

Greensboro 
Dr. E. Charles Powell 

Goldsboro 
Ralph C. Price 

Greensboro 
Miss Gertrude Weil 

Goldsboro 



86 



The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 



COMMITTEE ON PROGRAMS IN SCHOOLS, 
COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES 

Dr. Chalmers G. Davidson 
Davidson Co-chairman 

Dr. Paul Murray 
Greenville Co-chairman 



Miss Tyrtle Brock 

Trenton 
Miss Lois Byrd 

Sanford 
H. H. Clark 

Elizabethtown 
Miles S. Clark 

Elizabeth City 
Dr. John S. Clayton 

Chapel Hill 
Dr. H. H. Cunningham 

Elon College 
Mrs. Bobbye Dean 

Winston-Salem 
Miss Tabitha M. DeVisconti 

Farmville 
Dr. D. B. Dougherty 

Boone 
Mrs. Fred B. Drane 

Edenton 
Miss Lois Edinger 

Greensboro 
Malcolm Fowler 

Lillington 
Dr. I. G. Greer 

Chapel Hill 
Hon. S. Glenn Hawfield 

Monroe 
Mrs. Rebecca Hester 

High Point 
Mrs. Ida Jenkins 

Greensboro 
Homer Lassiter 

Raleigh 



Mrs. P. P. McCain 

Wilson 
Mrs. Helen P. Miller 

Greensboro 
Donald Morrow 

Raleigh 
Hon. R. A. Nunn 

New Bern 
Miss Inez Page 

Durham 
Miss Iola Parker 

Chapel Hill 
Miss Louise Puckett 

Charlotte 
William Y. Richardson 

Salisbury 
Col. Paul A. Rockwell 

Asheville 
William P. Saunders 

Southern Pines 
Miss Betty Smith 

Raleigh 
Dr. Robert H. Spiro, Jr. 

Macon, Georgia 
R. B. Starling 

Greenville 
John R. Taylor 

New Bern 
Dr. Rosser Taylor 

Cullowhee 
B. S. Womble 

Winston-Salem 
Mrs. F. S. Worthy 

Washington 



Appendix I 



87 



REPRESENTATIVES OF COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES 

(Listed alphabetically by college or university) 



Dr. Albert W. Spruill 

Agr. & Tech. Coll. of N. C. 
Dr. D. J. Whitener 

Appalachian St. Teachers Coll. 
Dr. Daniel McFarland 

Atlantic Christian College 
Dr. C. Gregg Singer 

Catawba College 
Dr. Malcolm Lester 

Davidson College 
Prof. John Alden 

Duke University 
Dr. Paul Murray 

East Carolina College 
Dr. Charles Lyons, Jr. 

Eliz. City St. Teachers Coll. 
Prof. Charles Lynam 

Elon College 
Dr. Marvin L. Skaggs 

Greensboro College 
Dr. Alan D. Aberbach 

Guilford College 
Dr. Harold E. Conrad 

High Point College 
Prof. William P. Brandon 

Lenoir Rhyne College 
Mrs. Eloise Simpson 

Livingstone College 
Dr. Sarah M. Lemmon 

Meredith College 
Dr. L. Stacy Weaver 

Methodist College 



Dr. J. H. Taylor 

N. C. College of Durham 
Dr. Stuart Noblin 

N. C. State 
Dr. Willard Gatewood 

N. C. Wesleyan College 
Dean Cameron West 

Pfeiffer College 
Jack W. Rollow 

Queens College 
Thomas H. Johnson 

St. Andrews Presbyterian Coll. 
Dr. E. C. Schwertman 

St. Augustine's College 
Prof. A. Hewson Michie 

Salem College 
Dr. Moses N. DeLaney 

Shaw University 
Pope A. Ducan 

S. E. Baptist Theol. Seminary 
Charles Shaffer 

University of N. C, Chapel Hill 
Dr. W. B. Yearns 

Wake Forest College 
Dr. D. C. Sossomon 

Western Carolina College 
Mrs. Louis S. Hamilton 

Winston-Salem Teachers Coll. 
Dr. Blackwell Robinson 

Woman's College of UNC 



The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 



REPRESENTATIVES OF JUNIOR COLLEGES 



Col. William H. Quarterman 

Asheville-Biltmore College 
G. A. Tripp 

Campbell College 
V. L. McBride 

Chowan College 
Dr. Garland Allen 

Gardner-Webb College 
Ira Gambill 

Lees-McRae College 
William Carrington Gretter, Jr. 

Louisburg College 
Mrs. Katherine Nooe Knox 

Mitchell College 
Miss Elizabeth Hoyt 

Montreat-Anderson College 



Donald E. Becker Councill 

Mt. Olive Jr. College 
Miss Elizabeth Caldwell 

Peace College 
Sister M. Christine 

Sacred Heart Jr. College 
Miss Elizabeth Tucker 

St. Mary's Jr. College 
David W. Hempleman 

Warren Wilson College 
Ducan P. Randall 

Wilmington College 
Mrs. S. R' Gaddy 

Wingate College 



SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENTS 

(listed alphabetically by counties) 



S. W. Payne 

Alexander County Schools 
J. E. Rufty 

Alleghany County Cchools 
James W. Jenkins (Anson) 

Morven City Schools 
W. L. Wildermuth (Anson) 

Wadesboro City Schools 
Frank James 

Ashe County Schools 
W. Kenneth Anderson 

Avery County Schools 
W. F. Veasey 

Beaufort County Schools 
Edwin A. West (Beaufort) 

Washington City Schools 
John L. Dupree 

Bertie County Schools 
D. M. Calhoun 

Bladen County Schools 
John Greely Long 

Brunswick County Schools 
T. C. Roberson 

Buncombe County Schools 
R. L. Patton 

Burke County Schools 
W. A. Young (Burke) 

Glen Alpine City Schools 



Maston S. Parham (Burke) 
Morganton City Schools 

C. A. Furr 

Cabarrus County Schools 

Woodrow W. Hartsell (Cabarrus) 
Concord City Schools 

C. M. Abernethy 
Caldwell County Schools 

J. G. Hagaman (Caldwell) 
Lenoir City Schools 

D. B. Burgess 

Camden County Schools 
H. L. Joslin 

Carteret County Schools 
Thomas H. Whitley 

Caswell County Schools 
Wilmer M. Jenkins (Catawba) 

Hickory City Schools 
Jason B. Deyton 

Chatham County Schools 
Lloyd W. Hendrix 

Cherokee County Schools 
Charles O. Frazier (Cherokee) 

Andrews City Schools 
Holland McSwain (Cherokee) 

Murphy City Schools 
W. J. Taylor 

Chowan County Schools 



Appendix I 



89 



School Superintendents (contd.) 



Hiram J. Mayo 

Edenton City Schools 
Hugh Scott Beal 

Clay County Schools 
B. N. Barnes (Cleveland) 

Kings Mountain City Schools 
Malcolm E. Brown (Cleveland) 

Shelby City Schools 
G. H. Arnold (Columbus) 

Whiteville City Schools 
R. L. Pugh 

Craven County Schools 
H. J. MacDonald (Craven) 

New Bern City Schools 
F. D. Byrd, Jr. 

Cumberland County Schools 

B. M. Holcombe (Cumberland) 
Fort Bragg Schools 

S. C. Chandler 

Currituck County Schools 
Mrs. Mary L. Evans 

Dare County Schools 
E. L. Brown 

Davidson County Schools 
L. E. Andrews (Davidson) 

Lexington City Schools 
W. S. Horton (Davidson) 

Thomasville City Schools 
William T. Bird 

Davie County Schools 

C. H. Chewning 
Durham County Schools 

Lew W. Hannen (Durham) 

Durham City Schools 
Morris S. Clary 

Edgecombe County Schools 
C. B. Martin (Edgecombe) 

Tarboro City Schools 
Thomas Ray Gibbs 

Forsyth County Schools 
Marvin M. Ward (Forsyth) 

Winston-Salem City Schools 
Wiley F. Mitchell 

Franklin County Schools 
Jesse L. McDaniel (Franklin) 

Franklinton City Schools 
W. P. Sugg 

Gaston County Schools 
William H. Brown (Gaston) 

Cherryville City Schools 



W. C. Harrell 

Gates County Schools 
James A. Stanley 

Graham County Schools 
C. W. Duggins (Granville) 

Oxford City Schools 
Phillip J. Weaver (Guilford) 

Greensboro City Schools 
Dean B. Pruette (Guilford) 

High Point City Schools 
W. Henry Overman 

Halifax County Schools 
J. W. Talley (Halifax) 

Roanoke Rapids City Schools 
W. Paul Hammack (Halifax) 

Weldon City Schools 
G. T. Proffit 

Harnett County Schools 
L. B. Leatherwood 

Haywood County Schools 
Culver Pv. Dale (Haywood) 

Canton City Schools 
j. M. Foster 

Henderson County Schools 
Hugh D. Randall (Henderson) 

Hendersonville City Schools 
Russell P. Martin 

Hertford Countv Schools 
W. T. Gibson, Jr. 

Hoke County Schools 
Ben D. Quinn 

Hyde County Schools 
Frank L. Austin 

Iredell County Schools 
Roland R. Morgan (Iredell) 

Mooresville City Schools 
E. S. Simpson 

Johnston County Schools 
W. B. Moore 

Jones County Schools 
J. J. Lentz 

Lee County Schools 
M. A. McLeod (Lee) 

Sanford Citv Schools 
H. H. Bullock 

Lenoir County Schools 
J. P. Booth (Lenoir) 

Kinston City Schools 
Norris S. Childers 

Lincoln Countv Schools 



90 



The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 



School Superintendents (contd.) 



S. Ray Lowder (Lincoln) 

Lincolnton City Schools 
Hieronymous Bueck 

Macon County Schools 
J. C. Manning 

Martin County Schools 
James Johnson (McDowell) 

Marion City Schools 
A. Craig Phillips (Mecklenburg) 



County & Charlotte 
Walter L. Thomas 

Mitchell County Schools 
S. H. Helton 

Montgomery County Schools 
R. E. Lee 

Moore County Schools 
Lew's S. Cannon (Moore) 

Pinehurst City Schools 
Luther A. Adams (Moore) 

Southern Pines City Schools 
S. H. Fries 

Nash County Schools 
D. S. Johnson (Nash) 

Rocky Mount City Schools 
Wilham H. Wagoner 

New Hanover County Schools 
R. F. Lowry 

Northampton County Schools 
I. B. Hudson 

Onslow County Schools 
G. P. Carr 

Orange County Schools 
Joseph M. Johnston (Orange) 

Chapel Hill City Schools 
T. J. Collier 

Pamlico County Schools 
J. H. Moore 

Pasquotank County Schools 
B. E. Fountain (Pasquotank) 

Elizabeth City, City Schools 
B. L. Davis 

Pender County Schools 
John T. Biggers 

Perquimans County Schools 
R. B. Griffin 

Person County Schools 
D. H. Conley 

Pitt County Schools 



J. H. Rose (Pitt) 

Greenville City Schools 
David A. Cromer 

Polk County Schools 
W. S. Hamilton (Polk) 

Tryon City Schools 
W. J. Boger, Jr. 

Randolph County Schools 
Guy B. Teachey (Randolph) 



City Schools Asheboro City Schools 
F. D. McLeod 

Richmond County Schools 
Maylon McDonald (Richmond) 

Hamlet City Schools 
J. E. Huneycutt (Richmond) 

Rockingham City Schools 

B. E. Littlefield 
Robeson County Schools 

Joseph H. Wilson (Robeson) 
Fairmont City Schools 

L. Gilbert Carroll (Robeson) 
Lumberton City Schools 

D. M. Singley (Robeson) 
Maxton City Schools 

Walter R. Dudley (Robeson) 

Red Springs City Schools 
Marion W. Bird (Robeson) 

Saint Pauls City Schools 
J. M. Hough (Rockingham) 

Leaksville City Schools 
V. Mayo Bundy (Rockingham) 

Madison-Mayodan City Schools 

C. C. Erwin 
Rowan County Schools 

J. H. Knox (Rowan) 
Salisbury City Schools 

Forrest Hunt 

Rutherford County Schools 

J. T. Denning 

Sampson County Schools 

E. C. Sipe (Sampson) 
Clinton City Schools 

J. J. Pence 

Scotland County Schools 
A. B. Gibson (Scotland) 

Laurinburg City Schools 
R. M. Green 

Stokes County Schools 



Appendix I 



91 



School Superintendents (contd.) 



J. Sam Gentry 

Surry County Schools 
N. H. Carpenter (Surry) 

Elkin City Schools 

B. H. Tharrington (Surry) 
Mt. Airy City Schools 

T. L. Woodard 

Swain County Schools 

C. W. Bradburn 
Transylvania County Schools 

Dan S. Davis 

Union County Schools 
Oscar W. Broome (Union) 

Monroe City Schools 
J. C. Stabler 

Vance County Schools 
Fred A. Smith 

Wake County Schools 
Jesse O. Sanderson (Wake) 

Raleigh City Schools 
J. Roger Peeler 

Warren County Schools 



S. D. O'Neal 

Washington County Schools 
W. G. Angell 

Watauga County Schools 
R. S. Proctor 

Wayne County Schools 
Samuel J. Cole (Wayne) 

Fremont City Schools 
N. H. Shope (Wayne) 

Goldsboro City Schools 
C. B. Eller 

Wilkes County Schools 
J. Floyd Woodward (Wilkes) 

N. Wilkesboro City Schools 
H. D. Browning, Jr. 

Wilson County Schools 
J. T. Odom, Jr. (Wilson) 

Elm City, City Schools 
George S. Willard (Wilson) 

Wilson City Schools 
Fred C. Hobson 

Yadkin County Schools 



92 



The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 



COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC INFORMATION ACTIVITIES 



Henry Belk 
Goldsboro Chairman 



C. Alden Baker 

Elizabeth City 
H. C. Bradshaw 

Durham 
Mrs. James M. Harper, Jr. 

South port 
Claud O'Shields 

Wilmington 



Charles Parker 

Raleigh 
Dr. Clarence Poe 

Raleigh 
E. L. Rankin, Jr. 

Raleigh 
J. P. Strother 

Kinston 



COMMITTEE ON RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES 

Rt. Rev. Thomas H. Wright 

Wilmington Chairman 

Rev. Harold J. Dudley 

Raleigh Co-chairman 



Rt. Rev. Richard H. Baker 

Raleigh 
Dr. Bernard Boyd 

Chapel Hill 
Dr. Douglas M. Branch 

Raleigh 
Dr. Joseph H. Carter 

Statesville 
Rev. John W. Cobb 

Raleigh 
Dr. F. L. Conrad 

Salisbury 
Dr. Albert G. Edwards 

Raleigh 
Rev. Clyde Fields 

Elon College 
Dr. Kenneth Goodson 

Winston-Salem 
Rev. Nolan R. Harmon 

Charlotte 



Rev. Carl F. Herman 

Greensboro 
Rev. Morton Kurtz 

Durham 
Dr. Neill R. McGeachy 

Statesville 
Rt. Rev. James E. McSweeney 

Raleigh 
Dr. Clyde A. Milner 

Guilford College 
Rev. C. E. Norman 

Cary 
Adm. A. M. Patterson, USN (Ret.) 

Raleigh 
Dr. Fred Rypins 

Greensboro 
Dr. L. Stacy Weaver 

Fayetteville 



Appendix I 



93 



COMMITTEE ON SCHOLARLY ACTIVITIES 

David Stick 

Kitty Hawk Chairman 

William S. Powell 

Chapel Hill Co-chairman 



Dr. John Alden 

Durham 
Mrs. Memory F. Mitchell 

Raleigh 
John Fries Blair 

Winston-Salem 
Ashbel G. Brice 

Durham 
D. L. Corbitt 

Raleigh 
Dr. Chalmers G. Davidson 

Davidson 
Dr. Cecil Johnson 

Chapel Hill 
Benjamin Koonce 

Raleigh 



Dr. Hugh T. Lefler 

Chapel Hill 
Elizabeth Vann Moore 

Edenton 
Dr. Paul Murray 

Greenville 
Sam Ragan 

Raleigh 
Dr. Blackwell P. Robinson 

Greensboro 
Dr. David L. Smiley 

Winston-Salem 
Miss Mary Thornton 

Chapel Hill 
Dr. R. H. Woody 

Durham 



COMMITTEE ON TOURIST ACTIVITIES 

Dan M. Paul 
Raleigh Chairman 



94 The Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission 

APPENDIX II 

NORTH CAROLINA TERCENTENARY 
CELEBRATION COMMISSION 

Authorized by Public Law 87-437, 2nd Session 87th Congress 

Appointed by the President of the United States 

Hon. Frank Porter Graham 
United Nations, N. Y. (Chairman) 

Mrs. L. Y. Ballentine Mrs. John A. Kellenberger 
Raleigh, N. C. Greensboro, N. C. 

Hon. Luther H. Hodges Dwight Phillips 
Washington, D. C. Charlotte, N. C. 

Bruce Jolly William S. Powell 
Washington, D. C. Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Appointed by the Vice President 

Senator Sam J. Ervin, Jr. Senator Olin D. Johnston 

North Carolina South Carolina 

Senator B. Everett Jordan Senator Thomas H. Kuechel 

North Carolina California 

Appointed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives 

Rep. Charles R. Jonas Rep. Albert Rains 

North Carolina Alabama 

Rep. Horace R. Kornegay Rep. Basil L. Whitener 

North Carolina North Carolina 



Appendix III 95 



APPENDIX III 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES OF CAROLINA CHARTER 
CORPORATION FUNDS 

September 14, 1960-December 31, 1963 

RECEIPTS 

Contributions obtained by State Commisison $25,225.00 
Contributions obtained by Federal Commission 4,928.27 
Sales of publications and souvenir items 6,275.54 

Royalty payments from TV stations 300.00 

Proceeds of loan, Winslow et al 7,500.00 

Sale of tickets to Sojourner 614.75 

Total Receipts $44,843.56 U) 

EXPENDITURES 

N. C. Dept. of Revenue— Sales tax payments $ 229.54 
Hunter Johnson-fee for North State 2,480.00 

Expenses of reception, Art Exhibit 509.34 

Carlisle Floyd— fee for Sojourner 5,000.00 

Boosey & Hawkes, Inc.— publication of Sojourner 2,500.00 
Grants to Junior Tarheel Historian Association 

for operation of Mobile Museum 5,000.00 

Expenses incident to production of Sojourner 13,688.38 
Wachovia Bank— interest on loan, Winslow et al 31.25 
Wachovia Bank— payment on principal of loan 2,000.00 
Miscellaneous 212.91 

Total Expenditures $31,651.42 

Balance on Hand December 31, 1963 $13,192.14 

U) Does not include acquisition cost of Mobile Museum donated by R. J. Reynolds 
Tobacco Co. and Chevrolet Motors Division, GMC, having estimated value of 
$42,500.00.